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Doctor Sleep

Comparison:

  • Theatrical Version
  • Director's Cut
Release: Mar 01, 2020 - Author: Muck47 - Translator: Mike Lowrey - external link: IMDB

Comparison between the theatrical version and the Director's Cut (both available as VOD version, also included on the German Blu-rays / 4K-UHD)


- 118 deviations, including 29x alternative course
- Difference: 1693.7 sec (= 18:14 min)

 

The sequel to SHINING and again two versions in home cinema

In 1977, Stephen King published the novel The Shining, and three years later, Stanley Kubrick staged his film adaptation Shining, which in many aspects differed greatly from the original. In 2009, King had a vote on his website whether he should continue his Dark Tower saga, which had already been filmed, or work on a sequel to Shining. The choice fell on the latter and so his novel Doctor Sleep was published 4 years later. Warner Bros. soon secured the movie rights and in 2019, the film adaptation of Doctor Sleep with Ewan McGregor landed in the movie theaters of the world.

Here, King focuses on the career of little Danny, who after his traumatic childhood experiences (just like his father) has become addicted to alcohol and thus suppresses his abilities. The autobiographical themes of alcoholism and family trauma, which are already autobiographical in the original, are consequently continued here. This is embedded in a framework story about a group of pilgrims who hunt children with the Shining. Dan(ny) thus meets the young girl Abra, with whom he defends himself against the group. It is striking that director Mike Flanagan, apart from an adaptation of the book, also continues some of the peculiarities of Kubrick's film and of course references some iconic scenes/characters from the latter. With overall quite positive reviews, it can hardly be denied that a certain mysterious and threatening mood as well as the simply perfect staging of Kubrick's film is not achieved. But from that point on it's a very interesting and by no means completely messed up sequel.

In addition to the European version of The Shining, the 23-minutes-longer US version has always been a topic among fans. It distinguishes itself especially by more "explanatory" scenes, e.g. in the form of more detailed conversations, which emphasize character traits that are also recognizable in the EU version. The opinion is divided here: Some people prefer the crisper and more open short version, some don't want to miss the additional dialogues. In the course of the 4K premiere, this version came to Europe for the first time in 2019.

Pretty soon after the (financially disappointing) theatrical release of Doctor Sleep, it became known that a Director's Cut could be expected in home cinema. It runs 30 minutes longer and Flanagan already announced that the film was closer to the novel in this cut. In America, the film was released on VOD, Blu-ray and 4K-UHD.

In addition to the European version of The Shining, the 23-minutes-longer US version has always been a topic among fans. It distinguishes itself especially by more "explanatory" scenes, e.g. in the form of more detailed conversations, which emphasize character traits that are also recognizable in the EU version. The opinion is divided here: Some people prefer the crisper and more open short version, some don't want to miss the additional dialogues. In the course of the 4K premiere, this version came to Europe for the first time in 2019.

Pretty soon after the (financially disappointing) theatrical release of Doctor Sleep, it became known that a Director's Cut could be expected in home cinema. It runs 30 minutes longer and Flanagan already announced that the film was closer to the novel in this cut. In America, the film was released on VOD, Blu-ray and 4K-UHD.

The differences in the Director's Cut of DOCTOR SLEEPS

A change that is independent of the difference in runtime, which immediately catches your eye and underlines the commentary on the book style, is the division into 6 chapters. Corresponding insertions appear throughout the movie and thus Flanagan pays a clear tribute to King's original novel.

Various other adjustments go into more detail concerning several side characters: The True Knot gets more screentime in several scenes and the motives become clearer. Right from the beginning, the threat is more tangible through the more detailed encounter with the first victim and Rose (Rebecca Ferguson) is allowed to show her ideas of power in several commentaries. Her partner Crow is accordingly submissive and you can now see him overpowering Abra's father David. Generally, Abra's parents get some additional scenes, which does justice to King's focus on family issues. Especially Abra's relationship with father David seems to be a better counterpart for Dan's problematic relationship with Jack.

Not surprisingly, Dan's psychological problems get more space in the director's cut, of course. Especially in extensive extended conversations with his friend Billy as well as Hallorann, he confronts inner demons more often, resp. cleans up with his childhood experiences. The longer exchange with Jack Nicholson's bartender-double Lloyd in the finale has a similar effect. The scene with Wendy at the beginning, according to which she has problems to look Dan in the eyes, is also emotionally stirring. Even smaller details stand out, like the mention of a broken arm in the meeting of the anonymous alcoholics. This almost corrects Kubrick's trivialization of the impact of Jack's alcoholism failures, because in his movie it only resulted in a dislocated shoulder compared to King's original.

A little harder to summarize, but also noticeable are additional scenes with creatures/set pieces from Kubrick's film. So it's only here in the finale that we go into the red bathroom again. This is also an exciting addition, as Jack aka Lloyd already plays Dan against Abra, so that his following attack on her gets a meaningful basis. Also at the beginning, the ghost of Mrs. Massey, which is probably remembered by everyone because of the impressive shock effect, rises completely out of the bathtub. In general, one sees the frightening corridors and creatures that Kubrick has established somewhat more often.

All in all, both versions have their charms. But for the first viewing the theatrical version is recommended. If this version was already too long-winded and dialog-heavy for you, you won't enjoy the director's cut at all. You shouldn't expect a completely different movie, despite the high difference in quantity and runtime. Those who were fascinated by the characters and the atmosphere, both in the book and the movie, will get a nice opportunity to dive a little bit deeper. Moreover, the circle to the longer US-version of Kubrick's movie closes a bit: Here, too, things are deepened and more clearly worked out that are only subtly hinted at in the theatrical version of the sequel.

Runtimes are ordered as follows: theatrical version VOD in 24fps / Director's Cut VOD in 24fps

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The credits arrive earlier in the Director's Cut - right above the first aerial shot after the Warner logo.

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut




00:58 / 00:58-01:24

Violet walks longer through the forest and stops at some flowers. She looks at the caravan and continues walking.

26.2 sec




Alternative
01:21-01:24 / 01:47-01:53

In the director's cut, Violet asks about the roses: "Where did you find those?"
Rose: "I know all the secret places."

Instead, the theatrical version has an alternative view of Violet without dialogue.

Director's Cut 2,8 sec longer

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut




02:33 / 03:02-03:07

After the question about the color of the flower, Rose says: "Oh, it's okay, honey. You won't scare me. I promise."

5.3 sec




03:17-03:21 / 03:51-04:15

After Violet was caught with a loud bang, the theatrical version immediately changes to black.
The Director's Cut instead shows the mother searching for Violet. In the background, you see the van column driving away. Afterwards, it goes on without black screen.

Director's Cut 20,2 sec longer




In the follow-up shots, the theatrical version now also shows the title insertion. Instead, the DC refers to chapter 1.

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut




04:27 / 05:21-05:30

A first shot of the doorknobs and another one of Danny.

9 sec




04:56 / 05:59-06:03

Danny sits upright in bed a little longer.

3,8 sec




Alternative
05:15-05:19 / 06:22-06:38

In the DC, Danny can be seen again from the front, then the doorknob and a more distant shot from the back. In the theatrical version, the previous view from behind is a bit longer.

Director's Cut 12,4 sec longer

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut




05:36 / 06:55-07:17

Mrs. Massey crawls out of the tub much longer, initiated by a re-view of Danny.

22.1 sec




06:03 / 07:45-07:47

The doorknob again.

2.6 sec




06:43 / 08:27-09:04

Mother Wendy looks into the bathroom again after Danny has calmed down for a moment. There are footprints on the mat in front of the tub. From a corresponding close-up, the camera fades over to the outdoor shot.

36,8 sec




07:10 / 09:31-09:56

Hallorann talks to Danny in a little more detail. He emphasizes how much his talent was already noticeable back then and how it contrasted with his father's behavior; "Little boy, set to spend a long winter at that rotten old place. Just him and his mommy and daddy. Daddy as dark as that boy is bright. And, boy, is he bright. He's shining like fire in the one place, the worst place for someone who shines."

25.7 sec




Alternative
07:18-07:20 / 10:04-10:34

Also here more detailed dialogue in the Director's Cut, where Hallorann emphasizes that Jack didn't have full control over his actions.
Danny: "Daddy tried to kill me."
Hallorann: "It wasn't all him, you gotta know. That place fed his dark, like it fed on your light. And he had some light in him, too. Just like you got some dark. We all got both. It's not done with me. It ever strike you funny how I showed up when I did? When you needed me."

In the theatrical version, only the previous shot is a bit longer (not illustrated).

Director's Cut 27,4 sec longer




07:23 / 10:37-10:42

Hallorann says earlier: "My grandma taught me, and I taught you."

5.1 sec




07:36 / 10:55-10:56

Before Hallorann answers, he can be seen a short moment earlier...

0.8 sec


07:40 / 11:00-11:01

...and longer.

0.5 sec




Alternative
08:09-08:13 / 11:29-11:39

Again, somewhat expanded dialogue; "(The shining's like food.) They're mosquitoes landing for blood. The Overlook, it was always just pictures to me.
Along with this, a cut to Danny was added in the KF.

Director's Cut 5,2 sec longer

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut



Alternative
08:20-08:31 / 11:46-12:10

The theatrical version stays longer with the shot of Hallorann and shows again Danny and Hallorann then insignificantly earlier.
Again, the dialogue has been tightened and is considerably longer in the DC, although identical at the beginning; "(So, you in that damn hotel, you was like a million-watt battery all plugged in. And it ate it up.) You made it real. Started soon as you walked through the door. Can't do nothing about that, I'm sorry to tell you, but you're not a child. You're older now. Much older, in a way. You gotta hear this. (World's a hungry place.)"

Director's Cut 13,2 sec longer

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut




08:58 / 12:37-12:38

Hallorann insignificantly earlier when he addresses his grandfather.

1.1 sec




09:27 / 13:07-13:22

Hallorann tells more: "One day, he grabbed me, and he was real. His nails were long from growing in the grave, and they cut me, Doc. Cut me deep."

15 sec




Alternative
09:36-09:37 / 13:31-13:32

The theatrical version shows the box a little longer in Hallorann's hand, the DC changes earlier to the follow-up of Danny.

No time difference

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut




09:47 / 13:42-13:43

The box a little longer in Danny's hand.

1.1 sec




09:50 / 13:46-13:51

Two more takes at the end/beginning, with Hallorann saying, "Know every corner, every single thing."

5.1 sec




09:53 / 13:54

The box insignificantly longer.

0.5 sec




09:57-10:00 / 13:59-14:05

The shots of Danny and Hallorann have been shortened a little bit and Hallorann's identical commentary has been moved slightly accordingly.

Director's Cut 3,8 sec longer




Alternative
10:03-10:06 / 14:08-14:25

More wise words from Hallorann in the Director's Cut: "Let's get you back to Mama. Wendy'll worry, and she shouldn't have to worry another day in her life. That woman's paid her debt."

The theatrical version shows only one alternative shot to the short commentary "Let's get you back to Mama", in which the two get up.

Director's Cut 14,6 sec longer

Theatrical VersionDirector's Cut




10:08 / 14:28-14:29

A little tightening as the two of them look around.

1.1 sec


10:10 / 14:31-14:32

The follow-up shot is also slightly shorter.

0.7 sec




12:33 / 16:54-17:00

Before the shot of drunk Dan at the pool table, DC shows a first time how he wakes up later in bed.

5.5 sec




12:42 / 17:09-17:10

Dan's view of the bedtime playmate is a little longer.

0.6 sec




12:56 / 17:24-17:29

Before he looks into the mirror, you can see Dan hanging over the toilet bowl from below.

5,5 sec




13:03 / 17:36-17:40

The blue eye noticed in the mirror is explained in the theatrical version in a lively way directly with the punch in the face the previous evening.
Instead, the DC shows first shots from the bar, to which Dan comments offstage: "OK, I was having a drink with the lady, all right?"

4 sec




13:05 / 17:42-17:48

Before he reaches for the billiard ball, you see Dan again in front of the mirror and a first time next to the table.

5.9 sec




13:08 / 17:52

The half total is insignificantly longer.

0.6 sec




13:10 / 17:53-17:55

An extra half-length where Dan grabs the guy.

1.2 sec




13:12 / 17:57-17:59

A shot from behind.

1.8 sec

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