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Factory Girl

Comparison:

  • Theatrical Version
  • Unrated
Release: Aug 22, 2010 - Author: Jason - Translator: Dr. McNinja - external link: IMDB
"Factory Girl" is a bioepic, telling the story of Edith "Edie" Sedgwick, a 60ies fashion icon and temporary muse of pop artist Andy Warhol. The film is mainly focused on the time from Sedgwick becoming acquainted with Warhol until her tragic drug death at the age of only 28.
Technically on a high level (as with e.g. "Natural Born Killers", just about any possible options concerning colouring and recording were used), the film gives an impressive account of Edie's time-lapse-like rise and fall. Contentwise, the film is oriented towards quite stereotypical courses of action of this kind of dramas. Naturally, "Factory Gril" does not reinvent the wheel and in terms of character drawing, the makers of the film even commited a few cardinal errors. For one thing, they bended the truth, concerning the actual relationships between the characters then. This caused a few persons concerned to rectify some details in public after the premiere of the film. In case of a figure obiviously inspired by folksinger legend Bob Dylan (portrayed by the familiarly pale Hayden "Star Wars Ep. II & II" Christensen), the "name giver" decided to take legal steps against the representation of his person. Subsequently, the theatrical release of "Factory Girl" was delayed for a long time and Christensen is only mentioned as "The Musician" in the credits (and is not addressed by name in the whole film).

For another thing, the character drawings remain amazingly inexpressive (particularly for this kind of stories). No matter how intensely she is personated, the viewer can neither really relate to the figure of Edie Sedgwick, nor can he understand her behaviour and decisions at all. Additionally, the depiction of a nearly diabolic Warhol is rather disconcerting. He seems to support the people around him just as long as they are of use to him, only to cruelly let them fall afterwards.
What makes the film still well worth seeing, are the powerful performances of Sienna Miller as Edie and of Guy Pearce as Andy Warhol. They not only copy their outward appearance and their familiar gestures perfectly, but also superbly bring them to life in front of the camera. Especially Miller put her heart and soul into her acting and certainly delivers the best performance of her career.


For the home theatre market, an unrated version was released aside from the R-rated theatrical version. The unrated is nominally just under 9 minutes longer. This version also found its way overseas (e.g. to Britain) - but not to Germany. There, only the theatrical version was released (with, in view of the the subject matter, a quite generous FSK 12 - approval).
Most scenes which were re-inserted or alternately shifted, serve to specify character drawings and various aspects of the story which were only embedded in the theatrical version to some extent. However, there are also a few extensions with sexual contents and more explicit depictions of drug use. The respective footage does not particularly differ from what one could already see in the theatrical version to a great extent. But as is usual with the MPAA, there might have been restrictions concerning the commercially important R-Rating, in order to reduce or lessen the entire content of the drug consumption displayed.
In any case, the unrated version represents a sensible extension of the theatrical version. It has not only been filled up with a few deleted scenes (something which the sorely afflicted DVD buyer experiences often enough).


Run time information of the cut scenes refer to the theatrical version. Remaining run time difference results from the rounding of the run time of single cut scene to whole or half seconds.



Comparison between the theatrical version(rated R) and the Unrated Version, both released as single DVDs by The Weinstein Company.


- 37 extended scenes in the unrated version = 8 min. 54 sec.
(including 5 scenes containing partially alternative footage)
- 2 extended scenes in the theatrical version = 7 sec.
(including 1 scene containing partially alternative footage)
- 19 alternative shots without a (relevant) time difference
2:23
The shot of the painting is longer; Edie says that when the artist had presented his first paintings, everyone had thought he was insane. Syd takes a picture of the painting.
6 sec.



4:48
In the unrated version, Andy, putting a piece of chocolate in his mouth, is shown from different perspective than in the theatrical version. Additionally, he has some more dialogue and mentions that he would not even own a pink coat and wonders where he could buy one for this sort of parties.
5 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



5:52
At this point in the theatrical version, there are only shots of an arriving elderly couple and those of Andy, wondering if Picasso had already heard of him. These scenes are also featured in the unrated version (in a different order), however, embedded in a lot more scenes with spoken language: the redheaded woman asks what those people could possible know about art, whereupon Andy replies they knew how to buy it. The redhead tattles about these people as being so "50ies-style", boring and not really well-dressed - and somehow, very "English". Andy says he loves the English; he considers Mick Jagger very sexy and says he had heard that Jagger had "a really huge cock". The blonde girl turns her head in disbelief, while the readhead only smiles.
21.5 sec.



5:58
Andy replies to Sam that he was not alone. After all, he had both women with him. Sam smiles at the ladies and says that of course he was. The ladies do not seem too excited by his appearance (the redhead even taps off the ash of her cigarette on his jacket). Besides, the following shots start a little earlier; Sam asks if he could occupy Andy for a moment.
7 sec.



6:02
Additional shot of the two women; Sam's question from the off regardung Andy's film business was put over the previous shot in the theatrical version, after they both went off the screen.
3 sec.



7:32
Edie complains that there are four more olives in her drink. Andy asks if that was a problem, whereupon Edie replies it was not if he ate them, because she could not stand the thought. The following shot of Andy starts a little earlier than in the theatrical version: here, he starts the sentence with "Well, i don't really like olives, but...".
11 sec.



7:34
Edie says she would like it if Andy could just eat her olives now and just puts them in his mouth.
6 sec.



7:37
Alternative shot
In the unrated version, Andy has the olives in his hand while he says she just needed to be herself. In the theatrical version, it appears as if he ate one of his pieces of chocolate. The unrated version contains a few more single frames.
A few frames

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



7:42
Andy and Edie laugh at each other some longer; Edie says he should turn to Chuck because he would care of all details.
7 sec.



7:49
Sam asks Andy if he was a star now or not. The latter replies that he would like to work with her; he had never seen a woman with so many problems.
10.5 sec.



10:25
Ondine adds that cock rings fascinated him and that would find it great if his phone had one. Chuck nods in embarrassment and tries to change the subject. He asks Brigid if someone famous appeared in her book.
7 sec.



10:42
Here, the theatrical version just shows an alternative shot of the laughing Chuck and the slightly pensively looking Edie.
In the unrated version, there is now the short part of Ondine explaining that the penis, painted on a paper in front of him, was his (slightly extented by an additional remote shot). Besides, Brigid shoots up in her bottom, whereupon Andy asks what would happen if there was a police raid now. Brigid assumes indifference and winks at Edie who seems fascinated. Andy asks where "the sign" was, whereupon one of his fellows picks up a sign from the ground, which reads "No Loitering / No Drug Use".
11 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



10:48
Alternative shot
The shot of Chuck and Edie is a little different in both version. In the unrated, it is a moment longer, as well.
1 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



15:01
Here, a fast scene montage follows, showing Edie's electroshock therapy during her time in Silver Hill.
3 sec.



15:03
The theatrical version merely shows a remote shot of Edie on the phone and another one of the photo. In the unrated version, however, she lights a cigarette and starts to make herself up a little nervously, while some more, short shots from her time in Silver Hill are interspersed. Then she searches her purse for the number of a friendly nurse which she has written down on a matchbox. Soundwise, the dial tone and a starting conversation was superimposed over these events; the theatrical version misses the dial tone and the conversation starts during a shot of her photo.
22 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



15:57
In reply of the question if she still saw a doctor regularly, Edie smiles longer in the unrated version.
3.5 sec.



17:31
Alternative shot
In the theatrical version, Andy just looks at Edie's photo. In the unrated, he additionally holds one of Norma Jean alias Marilyn Monroe in his hand, which he subsequently also looks at.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



26:00
Chuck pulls Edie down to him and proclaims that Andy wants to go to Paris with them; Edie is delighted and immediately issues the order that everyone should set off. Then she asks the waiter for the bill. He replies that it would be ready in a minute. Edie says that a thousand things could happen in one minute, but that he should not ask her which things exactly because she would not know an answer to that. Eventually, she makes the request to have the bill sent to her and asks how her hair looked, whereupon the waiter replies: "Stunning!". He receives a peck on the cheek and a charming smile.
26.5 sec.



28:54
Merrily bawling, Chuck carries a sculpture of a rhino into the room, which delights Edie very much.
9 sec.



29:35
Andy can be seen a little longer in this shot.
1 sec.

31:08
Alternative shot
At this point, there follows various footage of Edie's rise in a fast cut scene montage.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



34:06
In tears, Edie adds that family life on the ranch was stunned for days and nothing happened.
8.5 sec.



34:12
In the theatrical version, there is another cut to Edie's mother at the funeral, while she says "Nobody.". In the unrated version, the cut to her is earlier so that one can see her saying it. Besides, she adds that not even her brother Jonathan had cried and that she had furiously and desperately struck her fists against his chest, without evoking any reaction on his side.
14 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



34:21
Extended scene of the theatrical version
Edie sobs once again and then looks down.
3 sec.



35:34
Alternative shot
Briefly different footage in the fastly cut scene montage of the party.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



35:37
The unrated version shows additional footage of the party life. In the theatrical version, the concluding filming of Andy was already inserted, which is shown at the end of the scene montage in the unrated version.
3.5 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



35:47
Completely new scene. Andy records footage of Edie in the Factory. After the take is shot, he wants Edie to tell them a story. Chuck says she should tell the "story of Arthur Waynerigde". First, Edie refuses, because it is a sad story in her opinion. Andy remembers that Arthur is a man of good family and eventually, Edie starts to tell the story anyway: Arthur was a school day friend who took her out on several dates - nothing special, but nice. One evening, she wanted to meet him again, but met Chuck at the said place and got into a long talk about everything and anything, so they forgot the time. Then Arthur showed up, and because he was very "possessive" and she did not want to hurt his feelings, she asked Chuck to hide.
Meanwhile, Arthur proposed to Edie, including prostrating before her and a wedding ring from Tyffany's. But when he started taling about moving to Connecticut and having children, she declined. Arthur burst into tears and, according to Edie, was a paradoxon from one moment to the next; someone who had everything, reduced to purely nothing. Then Chuck came out of hiding and could not help but laugh hysterically; Arthur was a different person from that moment on.
Shamefacedly, Chuck says that Arthur had been boring. Edie replies that he had been sweet and that Chuck was totally resentless. Andy looks astounded.
103 sec.



35:51
Alternative shot
In the theatrical version, one can see Edie getting a shot earlier, before the camera pans up on her; in the unrated version, however, one sees the woman from the previous shot, receiving an injection in the chest.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



36:52
Edie and Syd take off in the cab and talk about the old times. After they have arrived at the Astor, the driver demands his money, 85 cents. Syd notices that he has no cash on him. Edie laughs and says she never had any on her as well. Before the cab driver can protest, she happily gives him one of her (not really inexpensive) rings and a peck on the cheek. Then, one sees them getting off.
27 sec.



37:49
Bob gies to the stage longer and makes some short sound checks. At this, he turns around to her a few times. Edie gazes after him with apparently mixed feelings.
17 sec.



38:07
Here, both versions show roughly the same scene, but in the theatrical version, only Edie and Bob sit in the restaurant while in the unrated version, Syd is there, too. Thus, the scenes go off differently, even though there are some identical parts. The course of the scene is much longer in the unrated version.

Theatrical version: Edie shows Bob the drawing of a bird (which is different from the one in the unrated version, by the way). Upon this, he says it looked really well. He mentions that he and Sid had seen some of her films, but were quite indecisive about what they meant. Edie replies that she did not think they would mean anything. Then she mentions his songs and says that she found them very deep. She also asks him, by implication, what they meant. Bob replies that they would not mean anything and that he would just write down, what he saw.
Cut to the therapy session, where Edie says that Bob stood for everything that Andy was not and that she just wanted to free herself. Then, there is a cut to a panorama of the city, the camera shoots down to the flea market. (62.5 sec.)
Unrated version: Syd mentions that he and Bob had watched some of Edie's films. Bob says they found them very good, but they were quite indecisive about what they meant. Edie replies that she did not think they would mean anything. They were rather like looking at a sculpture of Henry Moore, "fading from the focus". The three of them start laughing. Bob states he did not know whether this was quite enlightening for him and Syd. Edie orders some milk for her coffee.
Next, there is the point where Edie asks Bob about his songs. This is nearly identical in both versions. Then Edie shows him her drawing of a bird. He is quite sold on it, while she makes a gesture of embarrassment. Bob asks if she was an artist. She negates and adds that she used to paint. Syd seems scared now and asks why she did not paint anymore nowadays. She replies that she had no more time for it and that she could not even sit quiet for a second. Bob encourages her to try and find the time for it again.
Cut to a lake in a park, where Edie actually calmly sits and draws. She looks rather pensive. (119.5 sec.)
57 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



40:23
The scene in Edie's appartment starts much earlier: while she tries on pieces of clothing and asks Richie for her opinion, she also wants to know whether she also ever analysed things in her head for so long that she could not tell fiction and reality apart anymore. Richie replies that she knew that herself and the knocking on door were real and both laugh a bit. Edie pulls on a fur coat and adds that she just found that life should be a little less complicated. There is knocking on the door again.
44 sec.



42:05
Alternative shot
In the theatrical version, the rearward camera movement continues, while the unrated version cuts to a front shot of Edie, showing her reaction to Ondine's teasing.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



43:27
The balloon flies a little bit longer in the unrated version.
0.5 sec.



45:24
Edie tries to convince Bob to get him another drink. He shows indifference, whereupon Edie asks him to bring a smile on his face.
14,5 Sec.



46:49
In the theatrical version, one can see Andy a bit longer. In the unrated version, there is a cut to Chuck who adds "Oh yeah.". Then, he turns back to the mirror. Andy says the suit looked better.
8 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



46:59
Richie makes up Edie before her shooting and says she looked "fabulous". As a reward, she receives a peck on the cheek. From the background, someone shouts that they were ready.
18 sec.



49:22
The scene starts earlier; one sees Edie taking a sip from her drink.
7 sec.



49:43
Absent-mindedly, Edie pushes a flower pot from the window sill. It bounces off a mail box and lands on the sidewalk. Bob jokingly asks her if she tried to kill him.
6 sec.



50:14
Alternative shot
Different footage in this short shot.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



55:31
Alternative shot
The theatrical version has a distant shot from the side, while the unrated version cuts to a back view in which one can see Edie in the foreground. The unrated version is also a bit longer.
1 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:01:25
Alternative shot
Different shots of Edie's shooting.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:01:48
Alternative shot
Here, one can see the couple, enjoying themselves in the background, quite clearly now.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:02:33
Alternative shot
Different shots of Edie.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:03:10
Alternative shot
Dito.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:03:28
Alternative shot
And for the last time.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:03:37
Brigid tells Chuck that they both could not "be in Edie's skin."
4 sec.



1:05:10
Alternative shot
Different footage of Andy after the shooting.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:07:01
Alternative shot
In the theatrical version, Edie's attempt to warm up starts a little earlier. In the unrated version, there is a short flash of a street sign.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:09:49
Alternative shot
The theatrical version shows a stoned Edie a bit longer. Then one sees Andy walking up the stairs of an old house - now and then he looks down shortly. The unrated version, however, cuts to some men's nude pictures. Andy sits on a couch, has a few of those photos in his hand and masturbates while watching them.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:10:20
Alternative shot
Partially different scene footage during Edie's aimless floating through the city. For a change, the theatrical version is a bit longer here.
1 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:10:35
Edie gets a light for her cigarette from a woman, strokes her cheek and says absent-mindedly that she was beautiful. Then she goes on.
10.5 sec.



1:12:57
Bob's newly-wedded wife enters the screen and asks what was wrong. Bob looks at her sullenly and puts out his cigarette.
11 sec.



1:16:21
Edie shouts at Andy some longer, demanding that he look at her.
6 sec.



1:16:27
The shot of the distraught Edie is a bit longer. The next shot of Andy starts a bit earlier, as well.
5 sec.



1:16:31
Extended scene of the theatrical version
As Edie leaves the restaurant, both versions are cut differently. In the theatrical version, Edie is led out by a friend of Andy's. Edie struggles a bit. Additionally, there is a repellent and bashful gesture of Andy towards Chuck. In the unrated version, Edie leaves alone. Her departure is less spectacular and more quiet.
As an exception, the theatrical version is longer here.
4 sec.

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:17:54
Alternative shot
The theatrical version remains with a rearward shot of Edie getting a shot. The unrated version cuts to a front view, in which one can see more explicitly in a close-up, how the needle is injected into her bottom.
No time difference

Theatrical version:Unrated DVD:



1:19:43
The guy in the leather jacket slaps Syd on the shoulder. The latter replies testily that he should not dare to touch him. The guy lifts his arms and says "Peace, man.". Then, he turns around and finally leaves.
9.5 sec.

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