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Alexander

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  • Theatrical Version
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Release: Jan 06, 2011 - Author: Doc Idaho - Translator: DaxRider123 - external link: IMDB
Oliver Stone: "I've done what I did, and I stand by it."



Oliver Stone's Alexander came up the hard way with fans, critics and historians when it hit the cinemas in 2004 and most people passed on the movie. He clarifies that a lot of the things shown in the movie do not necessarily correspond to actual events but are more of an interpretation of the sources as well as a portrait of the person Alexander. Ptolemaios, reigning as Pharaoh of Egypt for many years after Alexander's death and preserving Alexander's and his mutual story for later generations, is often shown putting this story into perspective, elaborating different perspectives and talking of the changes in the records of others.


There aren't many directors daring to approach such complex stories that events have the world for centuries to come. But no matter how one builds the movie, which elements one emphasizes or leaves out, what kind of liberties one takes to make a certain point or which of the numerous sources one chooses as a basis for ones own work – many people will criticize the decisions and thus the movie or even reject it completely. One cannot please everyone.




Oliver Stone on "Alexander Revisited"

Dear Viewer,


Why a third version of Alexander? The best answer I can manage is, I couldn’t get it out of my system. It’s a film that’s been haunting me since the theatrical version first appeared in November 2004 in the U.S., followed by a Director’s Cut on DVD in July 2005.

But neither version was complete. It wasn’t an issue of right or wrong, or good or bad, but, like an experiment, one of trial and error. I believe this version now (3 ½ hours) is my clearest interpretation of Alexander’s incredible life.

For those who didn’t appreciate the original, rest assured this is my last pass, as there is no more footage to be found. And for those of you who did like it, please share with me my passion for “Alexander”, every sublime and awkward pixel of it.

[...] And I still believe -- “Fortune favors the bold”.

Sincerely Yours,

Oliver Stone




Oliver Stone nails the issue with one single sentence of King Phillip at the end of the cave scene where he shows young Alexander the gods and heroes of Greece and their legendary actions.



King Phillip: "Who knows these things?"


And while Alexander is lead out of the dark cave into the light to epically march into Babylon there are still viewers nitpicking on Colin Farrells hair, missing key sequences and Alexanders sexual orientation.



Oliver Stone: "It's tiresome to defend a film."


From the first script in 1996 to the actual movie in 2003 many planned and written scenes have been abandoned as being too lengthy and/or expensive. Oliver Stone makes his movies for the big screen and he never wanted to depict Alexanders life as accurately as possible as a mini series for television. No matter how much time he would have been granted to make the movie in the end, he always knew that he would never be able to show it all. Selections were needed. The Final Cut now runs three and a half hours and that is much as it gets. Some things, like the siege of Tyros, he wanted to shoot but couldn't. Other things, like the oracle of Siwa, the march through the desert and the battle of Chaeronea were present in early scripts but never shot.


Oliver Stone: "I never shot the siege at Tyre although I wanted to. It was just way too expensive ..."


Oliver Stone: "Siwa, the battle at Chaeronea, and the desert marsh were scripted, then left behind and never shot ..."


Also the intrigues of the generals, especially after the conquering of Asia, have been shortened and some subplots emphasizing on their interests and influence on Alexander were never shot. Some of it is vaguely present in all versions and many never quite finished topics are recognizable in the DC and FC a bit better the in the Theatrical Version and provide grounds for speculations about Alexanders death. However, Stone admits that it is merely an error on the scripts behalf that some subplots are never brought to a clear end.


Oliver Stone: "It is a flaw in the film, no doubt, and I hold myself certainly accountable."




In August 2005 Stone released a Director's Cut in the USA and some other countries that was oddly enough even shorter than the Theatrical version, despite the fact that Stone never found much sympathy for the demands of American cinemas for a version shorter than three hours.



Oliver Stone: "I yielded to theatrical pressures to truncate the story to less than 3 hours."


Oliver Stone: "I made a best effort, but I feel now in hindsight it was a false argument to begin."


If certain sites are to be believes, there isn't much difference between the Theatrical version and the DC. Somehow, it is all the same, mainly because Stone did not put in any new scenes, save for an extension of an already existing scene and a short insertion from Aristotle. However, he did change the movies structure; for example, the battle of Gaugamela is now seen earlier. Also, the movie is a bit more fast-paced since some scenes have been trimmed down and many dialogue details have been changed, something one most likely only notices if one knows both versions. A good example is Alexander being taught by Aristotle, as shown in the report.


The Director's Cut is a bit clearer than the Theatrical Version, the structure is a bit more demanding and the opening is better designed. It is altogether better than the Theatrical Version but not obligatory if you already own it. Especially with the Final Cut being released and containing many changes of he DC as well. The Director's Cut is also the version I would recommend if you have not see the movie at all yet. I will explain later why.


The FC is the third version in two and a half years. How this came to be, Oliver Stone explains in a letter to the DVD buyers (see above). Since 1996 Alexander has kept him up at night and for Stone the whole affair was just not finished with just the Theatrical version and the Director's Cut.



Oliver Stone: "It wasn’t an issue of right or wrong, or good or bad, but, like an experiment, one of trial and error."


For the Final cut Stone took practically everything that was kept on film during the shooting. There were a few moments exclusive to the Theatrical Version but those are only missing because they overlap with events in the Final Cut.


When the 45 minutes longer final Cut was announced fans across the internet were wondering which events from Alexanders life had been added to the film, and those who did not enjoy the Theatrical Version hoped the extensions would make the movie better. But those who have seen the Final Cut were in for a surprise. None of the numerous extensions provide new settings or stages in Alexanders life. The only true big extensions concerns Alexanders servant Bagaos. The homoerotic undertones were already in the Theatrical Version too much for many viewers. In the final Cut, we now get to know the servants name, he is noticed among many beautiful women by Alexander (much to Hephaistions regret), seemingly dances only for Alexander in India and even shares a bed with him.



Oliver Stone: "Everything is important to me -- sex life, moral life, and the burdens of childhood that weighed on Alexander's mind.

Oliver Stone: "Let's not carve out the sexual as a separate arena, it's part of a whole."


Apart from Bagaos the Final Cut merely offers more detailed characterizations, deepening of the characters relations to each other and short impressions of Alexanders life – often only as a commentary from the Off by Ptolemaios. On top of that, a healthy dozen of violent scenes have been re-integrated into the battle scenes that presumably had to to be cut for the Theatrical release, for they are a good deal more brutal than we are used from the rest of the film.


The most obvious change is again the structure of the movie. The battle of Gaugamela has been moved towards the beginning again (as planned in an early version of the script) and is seen even before Alexanders childhood and adolescence. The events in Bactria have been reassembled as well. First we see the wedding with Roxane, then the movie jumps back to the discussion with the generals and the celebration before that where Alexander meets and falls in love with Roxane before the movie jumps back to the wedding night. All other changes from the DC are present in the FC as well.


The Final Cut will remain Oliver Stones last version of the film. Or so he says, just like he says that, given the chance to start over he would have presented the FC on the big screen right away.



Oliver Stone: "Why have we lost this longer form of filmmaking?


Now, is the Final cut the best version of the film? In my opinion it is, and most people who have enjoyed the Theatrical version will certainly agree. It's not "much" but the extended running time does the movie good. However, those who already thought the Theatrical Version too long will regret to hear that now there passes even more time between the two battles. Those who did not enjoy Alexanders sex life before will not be happy either. All things considered, nobody who did not like the Theatrical Version is likely to change his mind over the Final Cut.


And even if Oliver Stone disagrees, I don't think that the Final Cut should be ones first version to watch – especially when not acquainted with Alexanders life. Showing the manic warlord early on in the Final Cut and the influences and motives that have made Alexander what he was is quite interesting on an artistic level – especially when one already knows the other versions – but not really suitable for the big audience. Those who don't know the film at all should therefore watch the DC first.


Three versions of the same movie certainly raise the suspicion that there is some major cash cow milking going on. But personally I think that it is quite interesting for fans to see the three different versions. Also, the two later versions were never very expensive or beefed up with extravagant packaging in order to appear fancier than need be. The Final Cut was obtainable for about $13 and even included a free ticket for the movie 300. Sure, "Alexander" was not very successful in America so nobody can hold it against Warner that they wanted to earn back the money they had spent but they did not trick anyone into spending ridiculous amounts of money on one single movie. In the end everybody has to decide for himself whether he wants to buy an additional version of the film or not.





The censorship reports


There are two reports. One comparing the Theatrical Version to the Director's cut and one comparing the Theatrical version to the Final Cut. Since the reports were made with some time between them the structure is somewhat different. Also, further down on this site the structure and scene order of the three versions is compared since they differ significantly.


Theatrical Version: ca. 175 min. (168 min. PAL)
Director's Cut: ca. 167 min.
Final Cut: ca. 214 min.
























Theatrical Version Director's Cut Final Cut


Title


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' introduction


Childhood


Adolescence


Philipps new bride


Philipps wedding ceremony


Ptolemaios at Gaugamela


Briefing


In the camp at night


Gaugamela


Babylon


Dareios


Welcoming party


Generals


Wedding


Wedding night


Treason


Hindu Kush


India


Philipps death


fight with mother


Riot


Battle in India


Back in Babylon


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' obituary


Ending credits



Title


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' introduction


Childhood


Adolescence


Ptolemaios at Gaugamela


Briefing


In the camp at night


Gaugamela


Babylon


Dareios


Welcoming party


Generals


Wedding


Wedding night


Philipps new bride


Treason


Philipps wedding ceremony


Hindu Kush


India


Philipps death


Riot


Battle in India


Fight with mother


Back in Babylon


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' obituary


Ending credits




Title


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' introduction


Briefing


In the camp at night


Gaugamela


Childhood


Adolescence


Babylon


Dareios


Wedding


Generals


Welcoming party


Wedding night


Philipps new bride


Treason


Philipps wedding ceremony


Hindu Kush


Intermission


India


Philipps death


Riot


Battle in India


fight with mother


Back in Babylon


Security


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' obituary


Ending credits

Flashbacks

Alternative footage:
When the camera pans zu Alexander's deathbed, you in the Theatrical Version only see one mourning fellow.
9 sec.

In the Final Cut there's an extensive scene where you also see Alexander's wife Roxane (who's pregnant) and other followers who either mourn or already think about a possible successor.
76 sec.



Alternative footage:
Ptolemaio's explanations in Alexandria stard differently and are a bit longer in the Theatrical Version. In the Theatrical Version he first tells a little about himself and that he was a Pharao for 40 years after Alexander's deat. Then he praises Alexander's greatness.
101.5 sec.



In the Final Cut, his narration about Alexander's army and that they were greatly feared. This is then continued in the Theatrical Version.
38.5 sec.



When Ptolemaios goes inside, the Final Cut cuts to the next scene from a different point in the movie.
1 sec.

Alternative footage:
In the Theatrical Version, his introduction ends with a comment about Philipp (Alexander's father) and his wish to conquer Babylon.
21 sec.



This comment was also included in the Final Cut, but here he goes on talking about Philipp's assassination which was probably promoted with Persian money. He also talks about Alexander being crowned as the king of Macedonia. In revenge, Alexander freed large parts of Western Asia and Egypt (where he was became Pharao and admired like a god). Then follows Alexander's declaration of war against the Persian sovereign Dareios.
59 sec.



Theatrical Version
Ptolemaios comment about Philipp's death and Alexander's first conquers follow a little later in the Theatrical Version (just before you see the Battle of Gaugamela). In the Theatrical Version, his remakrs are more detailed: at the beginning, he also talks about riots in Greek city-states and how Alexander defeated them without too much mercy. He also tells about the oracle in Siwa that appointed him as the son of Zeus. One part of these scenes is identical to the Final Cut.
125 sec.



The transitions to the next scene are different for both versions: The Theatrical Version now shows Alexander's childhood, while the Final Cut cuts to the Battle of Gaugamela.


Preparations for the Battle

When Alexander watches both armies from a distant hill, Ptolemaios comments it differently. In the Final Cut he also mentions that this encounter of East and West will decisive for the world they we knew it. The Final Cut also offers two new pictures.
8.5 sec.



Just before the movie cuts to the policy meeting, the Theatrical Version shows the old Ptolemaios.
2 sec.

In the Final Cut you instead see the meeples.
4.5 sec.

Apparently, the Theatrical Version wants to clarify who narrates this flashback. But since this is rather unnecessary, the Final Cut abandons this.

There are several extensions and re-cuts of the scenes inside the tent during the policy meeting. While many of the scenes were deleted for the Director's Cut, the dialogues are almost identical for both the Theatrical Version and the Final Cut. Nevertheless, the Final Cut offers an additional scene that could already be seen in the Direcotr's Cut. Shortly after Alexander explained how he wants to kill Dareios, Parmenion complains about Alexander's plan and says that horsemen have never ever been used to break through a crowd of infantry.
All in all, the Final Cut is 18 sec. longer.



When Alexander creeps through the camp at night, the scenes were often altered and/or shortened.

Pharnakes recognizes the lunar eclipse. Hephaistion approaches Alexander from a different angle.
17 sec.



Theatrical Version
When Alexander addresses Pharnakes, others stand up by the fire. Only in the Theatrical Version Alexander implies that they could sit back down.
2.5 sec.



When one of the men by the fire insults Pharnakes (by saying that the only reason that he's still awake is that he wants to make sure that no one steals the loot), the person concerned scowls in the Theatrical Version. Then Alexander promises them, that they soon wilö be as rich as kings. In the Final Cut, the unfortunate person goes on and says that the man is even too stingy to buy some clothes of good quality. Alexander then says that you can even go to war completely naked.
13 sec.



As soon as Alexander and Hephaistion leave, Pharnakes tells the rebellious boy that he tomorrow will be in the forefront. Suddenly, the boy feels sorry for his insolences.
5 sec.






Battle of Gaugamela

Alexander speaks about the magnificent war chariots, the terrific horses, and the mighty weapons of their opponents which won't do any good since they are used by slaves. During his speech, you see Pharnakes and the young soldier who insulted him. The poor boy is not in the forefront but still in one of the first few rows. He's so scared that he pisses his pants. Pharnakes sees it but doesn't sympathise with him at all.
29 sec.



After he admits, that many soldiers are going to die today, Alexander goes on talking. He praises this death, calling it courage and a sacrifice for their homeland. The crowd clamors.
48 sec. in total



A shot of the Persians before the armies come into conflict. 2.5 sec.



An additional war chariot is run down. 3.5 sec.



You can see the horsemen's diversion. 2.5 sec.



More tumult of the battle. 4.5 sec.



Ditto. A man loses his fingers. 14 sec.



A Persian is hit by a sword that flies through the air. 3.5 sec.



Dareios can be seen longer. 2.5 sec.



More tumult of the battle. 5.5 sec.



Theatrical Version:
Two shots are missing in the Final Cut. 6 sec.



Theatrical Version:
This sequence follows later in the Final Cut (when Alexander advances to the centrum).
-



Alternative footage:
The advancement towarts the centrum is shown in different pictures.
Final Cut is 0.5 sec. longer

Final Cut / Theatrical Version




Dareios tells the prince to engage the anxious troops behind him. 10.5 sec.



More tumult of the battle. One guy's eyes are squashed, then he's killed by an arrow; additionally, his knee gets injured. Then there's a missing kill by slitting the throat; one soldier fastens his teeth onto an enemy.
19 sec.



Alternative footage:
In the Final Cut, the left flank calls for back-up. In the Theatrical Version you only see a long shot.
Final Cut 4 sec. longer

Final Cut / Theatrical Version




Alexander further advances the centrum with his fellow horsemen. You see a Persian who stabs his sword in Alexander's thigh.
20.5 sec.



An additional shot of a severed arm. 1 sec.



One Persian is decapitated and the Macedonian then uses the severed head as a weapon. A part of the scene (where he his one of his enemies' face with the head) can also be seen in the Theatrical Version. But there you don't really see that it is a severed head.
3.5 sec.



When Dareios flees, his war chariot's blades cut off his fellow soldiers legs. 1.5 sec.



At the end of the battle the transition to the sickbay is longer. 10 sec.



Additions and Re-Cuts
When Alexander takes care of one of his soldiers (who is badly injured and waits for someone breaking his neck to deliver him from the pain), many of the shots are longer in the Final Cut and some of them were reorganized.
All in all, the Final Cut here is 15 sec. longer



Alternative footage:
After the last scene you in the Final Cut see the battlefield, while in the Theatrical Version you see the mourning Alexander in a close up shot.
Theatrical Version 3 sec. longer

Final Cut / Theatrical verison




At the end of the vulture-scene, you see Alexander in tears. 2.5 sec.



Theatrical Version
Just before you see the march-in in Babylon (and the Final Cut cuts back to Alexander's childhood), you in the Theatrical Version see a short repetition of the scene with Philipp inside the cave; also, you see the scene of the battlefield that was just mentioned for the Final Cut.
19 sec.






Flashbacks to Alexander's childhood

Theatrical Version
The opening of the scene with Olympias and Alexander in bed and the snake was cut out of the Final Cut, since there will be a flashback to this scene much later in the movie. Ptolemaios tells us something about Alexander's mother (who is often thought to be a witch) and the legendary men who some believe to be his fathers from off-camera. Olympias sings a quiet song while taking out the snake to give it to Alexander. Then she tells her son a little about the snake and that it can be a friend for Alexander if he chooses to adopts her.
66 sec.



Alternative footage:
The Final Cut begins with the snake being handed over to Alexander. Then, Alexander is warned not to hesitate because the snake will otherwise bite him. Now they inserted a new shot of the room - altogether with a time designation.
Theatrical Version 0.5 sec. longer



Alternative footage:
Just after you hear the drunk Philipp outside, you in the Final Cut get the information that was just given in the last cut from off-camera.
1 sec.

When Philipp lashes into Olympias, both versions have minor scene-extensions. 1 sec.

Alternative footage:
When you see Alexander and Hephaistion wrestling, the time designation was altered (just as in the Director's Cut).



Some scenes of the wrestling-training were extended, shortened or replaced with alternative takes.
17 sec.



The panning shot from the mountains to Aristotle's lessons begins earlier in the Theatrical Version.
0.5 sec.



The following scene was heavily re-cut and the lessons course was reorganized.

In the Theatrical Version the scene begins with elucidations about a seaway via India, the end of the world and the Nile back to Greece. Alexander then asks about each of these areas before one of the other pupils raises his hand to get to know more about the Persians (which actually shouldn't be a part of the lesson of that day). Only in the Final Cut Aristotle says that the Persians are so wicked that they actually castrate little boys for their own sexual pleasure.

In the Final Cut, the scene begins with the pupil's question about the Persians - happening before the explanation of the seaway and Alexander's question about these areas. In the Final Cut there's a new scene where Hephaistion asks Aristoteles, if the love of a man towards another man is equivalent to the love of a man towards a woman. Aristotle decidedly denies it, since women are always slaves of their passion. True, there are some exceptions like Athena (goddess of knowledge and war). Then Aristotle reemphasizes the importance of living according to these ideals - after all, these young men represent Greek's future.

While parts of the scenes are identical in both versions, there (in the Final Cut) are minor differences (besides these two extended scenes), especially because of the continuity. Anyway, the order of the scenes in the Final Cut is surperior, since it puts more emphasis on Alexander than the other pupil (whose comment in the Theatrical Version is annotated by Alexander with a smile). Also, Alexander in the Final Cut is emphatic about the fact that conquering the East was his father's desire. And after the teacher said that the East destroyed the dreams of many men, Alexander only in the Final Cut replies that it is absolutely desirable to conquer the East (just as it is told by the myths). Aristotle abandons withholding Alexander's euphoria and says that he can't teach him to be careful with what you dream of and wish for; he can only warn him.
All in all, the Final Cut is 101 sec. longer.



Alternative footage:
While Alexander tames his horse Bukephalos, two shots of his proud father and Parmenion were postponed to a different point, since the Final Cut shows a longer version of the taming. Attalos (who later on becomes Philipp's father-in-law) wonders, if Alexander really is Philipp's son - Phillipp is angry about this comment. Then he says to Alexander, that as soon as he acchieves to tame the horse he would be able to reign the world.
36 sec.



Alternative footage:
After Alexander found his horse, the transition to the cave is different.

The scene with Philipp and Alexander inside the caves was cut differently for both versions - again the Final Cut offers an extended version. In the Theatrical Version we first see Philipp and Achilles, then Prometeus, Ödipus, Madea and finally Hercules. In the Final Cut we first see Prometeus and Ödipus, then we see Jason before we see Madea, and then finally follow Achilles and Herakles. At the end of the scene you get some information about Zeus and the titans, who in the Director's Cut are mentioned at the beginning of the scene (there, you get even more information about Zeus). Only the Final Cut ends the scene with Philipp cursing the gods and relativizing their doings and powers to bring Alexander back down to earth.
116 sec.



Alternative footage:
At the end of the cave-sequence the transition is different. In the theatrical verison there's a cut to 8 years into the future. Philipp's next wife (Attalos' daughter) arrives. The Final Cut ends the flashbacks to Alexander's childhood and cuts to the entry into Babylon.



Babylon

The Final Cut begins with a long shot of the city. 8 sec.



Theatrical Version: The scene of Alexander entering the palace is longer. 3.5 sec.

Theatrical Version: Alexander walks through the palace a little longer. 11 sec.

Theatrical Version: Alexander looks down from the balcony. 3.5 sec.

Kassander notices old Greek artifacts in Babylon. Alexander tells him, that he wants to bring anything Greek back to Greece, but the Persian art belongs to the Persians. Prince Merdicus and the other Persian are surprised at this statement. Their reaction (which partially is also shown in the Theatrical Version) seems to make more sense.
14.5 sec.



When he comes up the stairs, Ptolemaios ssays that they now are the richest men in the world. 10 sec.



Theatrical Version: Alexander and the harem can be seen a little longer. 1.5 sec.

Theatrical Version: Two girls delightedly notice the men. 1.5 sec.

The scene with the harem was recut and extended for the Final Cut. While you in the Theatrical Version only see some beguiling dances, pleased men, and a laconic comment by Alexender just before the princess, the Final Cut goes way further. Alexander notices a younger man in the crowd. He approaches him, which is realized by one of the eunuchs who then goes to the man to introduce him to Alexander. The young man is Bagaos, one of Dareios' personal servants. Alexander seems to have a fancy for the young man which is also noticed by Hephaistion in the background, much to his discomfort. Alexander inquires after Bagaos' homeladn and if he plans to return home. Bagaos denies it, since his family is dead anyway. He says that he would be pleased to stay with Alexander. Alexander turns to his men (most of them enjoy themselves with the women) and says that everyone in this room (regardless of whether a lady of the harem or an eunuch) has the choice to go home if he/she wants to. Ptolemaios lets up on his new "girlfriend" and jocularly shouts to his men, that Alexander finally lets them go home. Everybody laughs and jestingly swoops down on Alexander to cause a little wrangling. While the men still enjoy the harem-ladies' company, princess Stateira appears in the background. Merdicus is not used to that amount of wantonness.
119.5 sec.



Theatrical Version:
After the princess asked for protection for her family and Alexander aksed her if there's anything else she might want, she in the Final Cut says that there's nothing else she might ask for. In the Theatrical Version she falters and Merdicus who's standing next to her helps her finishing the sentence from off-screen.
5.5 sec.

Alternative footage:
In the Final Cut there's a close up shot of the fight in the streets of Babylon. In the Theatrical Version, the fight is shown from above.
2 sec.



Alternative footage:
When Alexander reads his mother's letter and she judges Kassander, you in the Theatrical Version see Alexander, while in the Final Cut you see a flashback to Kassander and Philipp.
0.5 sec.



When Alexander and Hephaistion go on the balcony, Hephaistion asks why he's worried about his mother. He replies that she represents everything he's scared of. Yet still he's not sure what exactly causes his fear. Alexander doubts his determination/burden to (according to his mother) be the son of Zeus. Hephaistion tries to calm him down by comparing himself to Patroklos who died in Troy before Achilles did.
57 sec.



Hephaistion asks Alexander what he wants to do when he reached the end of the world (and freed all of humanity). Alexander replies that he then will turn around to march into the other direction.
12 sec.



Theatrical Version:
Hephaistion cajoles Alexander some more after Alexander told him that he loves him.
22 sec.





Bactria

Alexanders residence in Bactria was re-organized. The Theatrical Version begins with the feast, which is then followed by the generals' concerns; finally, we see Roxane's wedding. The Final Cut starts with the marriage, then follows the generals' meeting, and finally you see the feist. Additionally to these changes there are minor re-cuts or additions.

Alternative footage:
The wedding ceremony itself was re-cut several times but does not contain any new scenes. -

There's an additional shot of Roxane sitting in the middle, while the men around her celebrate. 3 sec.



Theatrical Version: You see how Alexander is presented with a golden egg by Roxane's father.15 sec.



Roxane again can be seen a little longer when Alexander demonstrates his generosity. 2.5 sec.



Alternative footage:
Merdicus is glad about Alexander's speech. Roxane's father looks a little unbelieving. In the Theatrical Version you only see Merdicus from a different angle.
4.5 sec.



Alternative footage:
The Theatrical Version ends the marriage with a shot of Hephaistions, who then in the next scene enters Alexander's rooms. The Final Cut shows a shot of the fortress before it cuts to the conversation with the high command.

Alternative footage:
At the beginning of the scene, Alexander's generals continue to make clear that they think it's a mistake to marry an Asian woman as one's first wife. It is explicitly mentioned that the Macedonians would never follow an Asian king if Alexander died. Parmenion's demand not to support the Asians but instead reign them is stressed some more later on.
37 sec.



The feist before the wedding (where Roxane dances in front of the Greeks) at the beginning offers an additional scene where Bactria's sovereigns try to get in with Alexander. They hand ther presents over to him and try to stay close to him to be able to cajole him some more. Oxyartes (Alexander's future father-in-law) tries to impress him as well by showing him captured bears and leopards, and praising his daughter to the skies. Alexander promises to always be available in times of war. But Alexander remains modest and generous by declining some of the presents with thanks. For Oxyartes this is a sign of weakness but he's able to overlook this. Within this scene you also see Hephaistion and Kleitos, who come to blows with each other for the first time. Furthermore, one shortly talks about Parmenion. They don't doubt his loyalty as long as his son Philotas stays with Alexander. But they think that his pessimism stands in the way of Alexander's plans. Several short sequences of the events can be seen later on in the Theatrical Version.
133.5 sec.



Alternative footage:
The following dance sequence by Roxane was cut differently for both versions. The biggest difference is that Roxane dances much longer in the Final Cut. Some of the sequences of the rest of the pary and the infighting between Hephaistion and Kleitos (which is a little more obvious in the Final Cut) were postpone to a different point.
52 sec.



Theatrical Version:
After the feist you can see Roxane in her wedding dress. This was cut out of the Final Cut.
12 sec.



Just before Alexander's and Roxane's wedding, you in the Final Cut can see Alexander inside his rooms before Hephaistion enters.
14.5 sec.



Roxane notices Bagaos in the background. 15.5 sec.



Alternative footage:
The sex scene is different as well. In the Theatrical Version there are just a few close up shots of their faces. In the Final Cut (just as in the Director's Cut) the Sex is obviously longer and shot from a more distant position. Also, there are some additional close up shots.
17.5 sec.



Alternative footage:
Subsequently (when a comment by Alexander's mother is overlayed with scenes of Alexander and Roxane), both versions partially use a different film montage. The Final Cut is a little longer.
15.5 sec.


Flashback to Alexander's Youth

Alternative footage:
The transition to Philipp's and his new bride's arrival is different.
3.5 sec.

Alternative footage:
When the two newlyweds get out of the carriage, they are shown a little longer in the Final Cut. In the Theatrical Version you instead see Olympias.

Olympias tries to convince Alexander of his father's malady a little longer.
20 sec.

Alternative footage:
At some point of the scene you in the Final Cut see Olympias a little longer. In the Theatrical Version you instead see Alexander.
1 sec.

Theatrical Version:
The Theatrical version ends this scene with Olympias' comment that Philipp will never leave the throne to Alexander just like that. The Final Cut offers a significantly longer scene...
8 sec.

Here, there's an argument between Alexander and his mother. Again, there's the comment about the throne, but here Alexander asks Olympias what he wants from him. Olympias tells him about a conspiracy. Alexander loses his temper since he knows that this will lead to a civil war. Olympias takes this into account as well but he thinks that Alexander will come off as the winner of this conflict, since all the young men from Macedonia have his back. She tells him that he doesn't have to be scared of killing Philipp, since the latter never wanted him as a son and is probably already thinking about killing Alexander as well. Olympias again makes it clear that Zeus is Alexander's real father. Alexander grabs his mother and tells her that he won't do anything about his father. Just before he leaves the room, he asks his mother if she ever really loved his father. She's highly indignant and says that she never stopped loving him.
131.5 sec.




Betrayal

Alternative footage:
The whole scene where Alexander almost drinks from the poisoned goblet, was re-cut. The Final Cut seems to be a little more rounded.
19.5 sec.



After Alexander asked his servant who tried to poison him, you see how a soldier goes to the conspirator's tent. The man notices it and stabs a sword through his body before he can be arrested.
17 sec.



Theatrical Version:
At the end you see the slaves standing in line in front of Alexander a little longer.
1 sec.

Alternative footage:
The confrontation with Philotas was re-cut and extended for the Final Cut. Alexander seems to be more determined.
25.5 sec.



Before the execution, Philotas and Alexander are shown a little longer. 8.5 sec.



The sequence's ending is longer as well. 1.5 sec.



Also, the soldiers are shown longer in front of the sunset. 1.5 sec.

Alternative footage:
Alexander works on the tax system a little longer. For the Final Cut, they used a different montage.
10 sec.



Alexander can be seen a little longer. 1 sec.



Theatrical Version: A shot of a map. 5 sec.



At the beginning, Parmenion can be seen earlier in Babylon. 4.3 sec.



Again you see Alexander sitting on the table with the maps and his draft of the tax system. 5 sec.



Parmenion lies on the floor badly injured. Then you see Alexander (who's lying on the bed) calling for Bagaos. Alexander strokes his cheek.



Theatrical Version: Parmenion is shown a little longer. 1 sec.



Theatrical Version:
In the Theatrical Version blows out the candle and then lies down next to Alexander. This was cut out of the Final Cut, since Bagaos is already in bed next to Alexander.
5 sec.



In the Final Cut, Alexander and Bagaos kiss. Bagaos then starts to caress Alexander's chest. 25 sec.




Flashback to Alexander's Childhood

As a transition to the next scene, you first see Alexander drinking.
9 sec.



Theatrical Version:
At first, Kleitos seems to kiss Alexander's forehead, but then he moves to his mouth and kisses him. 2 sec.

A little more goings-on at the feist. 8 sec.



Alternative Footage:
When Philipp indecently assaults a boy, the beginning of the scene was cut differently. While in the Theatrical Version you see Kleitos, in the Final Cut there are two new sequences that are a little more explicit than in the scenes in the Theatrical Version or the Director's Cut.
0.5 sec.



The poor boy is walked out a little longer. Then you see some women entering the room throug the door. 10 sec.




India

Alternative Footage:
When Ptolemaios and Alexander stand around on the mountain, they can be seen from a different angle. The Theatrical Version is slightly longer.
1 sec.



The Final Cut shows an Intermission, before you have to change the DVD.
97 sec.



Theatrical Version: An additional shot of India. 5 sec.



Alexander rides through the jungle a little longer. 2.5 sec.

A soldier creeps through the jungle a little longer while the monkeys above him scream. 5 sec.

Ditto. 4.5 sec.

An archer shoots at the monkeys. 1 sec.

More monkeys. 1.5 sec.

The Greeks watch the Indians a little longer. 4.5 sec.



Alexander plays with the monkey a little longer. Roxane stays upstage. 5.5 sec.



Alexander sits on a mountain with some half-naked men who can gaze into space for hours.12 sec.



Alternative Footage: The scene where lightning strikes was cut differently and extended for the Final Cut. 3 sec.



During the long rain, Alexander at the beginning of the scene walks through the camp. 8 sec.



Alternative Footage: Alexander bends over the ill old man - the order of the sequences was altered. 2 sec.



Kleitos notices and dodges the snake in the tree that bit the boy. 2.5 sec.



Alternative Footage:
Bagaos' dance in front of Alexander and the others was cut differently for both version - again, the Final Cut is longer. In the Final Cut, the whole thing seems to be a little more erotic and Bagaos dances in front of Alexander a little longer - much to the others' dislike.
78 sec.



Alternative Footage:
Alexander in the Final Cut kisses Bagaos from different angles - the sequences are slightly longer. Kleitos can be seen directly after this in the Theatrical Version.
5 sec.



A few of Alexander's men applaud because of his ability to hold his drink. 2.5 sec.



Alternative Footage:
After Roxane angrily left the feist, Keitos speaks up. While in the Theatrical Version he does that immediately, in the Final Cut Alexander first talks to Ptolemaios and sits down. Ptolamois comments on how Alexander used to hate it when his father drank that much. Even though Dyonisos is their hero, his wine also clouds their mind and they lose theri their self-control. But Alexander doesn't put any emphasis on that now anyway. Indians hand some gifts over to Alexander, while Kleitos boils inside because he doesn't like the position Alexander has him in mind for.
68.5 sec.



Alternative Footage:
Immediately after this the conversation (after Alexander sat back down) is longer, too. Kleitos refers to his new job (being the governor of Baktrien) as exile. Only in the Final Cut Alexander asks "Exil, of what?" and complains about being so far away from home. Alexander should have let him choose where he wants to grow old.
10.5 sec.



Just before the situation escalates and Kleitos says that it was Philipp who planned the expeditions in Asia, he only in the Final Cut says that Alexander was at that time ordered about by his sister.
4.5 sec.

When Kleitos says that, everything was better back in the days, he also mentions that back in the days they used to have fair fights inside a (boxing) ring.
5 sec.



Shortly after Kleitos mentioned that he had to save Alexander's life in Gaugamela he says that Alexander wouldn't have done the same for him.
4.5 sec.

Alternative Footage:
Kleitos final rebellion is a little more drastic in the Final Cut. In the Theatrical Version he insults Alexander before the latter kills him. In the Final Cut, the other men succeed in leading away Kleitos, and for a short moment the situation seems to be de-escalated. Suddenly, Kleitos pushes the door open and proudly enters while insulting Alexander a little more confidently, making his behaviour more effective. Then, Alexander grabs his spear.
39.5 sec.



Roxane rushes into Alexanders tent a little longer. 4.5 sec.



Theatrical Version: Kassander is shown a little longer. 1.5 sec.

The scene where Alexander regrets to have killed Kleitos and is dismayed about all the harm he caused for his wife and family is a little longer.
33 sec.



Alexander is worried about the people remembering Philipp while they seem to have forgotten all about him. He feels to have failed.
30 sec.



Alternative Footage:
The ending of the scene is different. In the Theatrical Version he only says that he has failed, while his self-awareness takes a little longer in the Final Cut.
18 sec.




Flashback to Philipp's Death

Right at the beginning of the scene, the acrobats are shown a little longer. 2.5 sec.



Theatrical Version: The crowd is shown longer when Alexander approaches them on horseback. 1 sec.

Theatrical Version: Ditto. 2 sec.

The positioning of Philipp's statue was cut differently and (again) extended for the Final Cut. 12 sec.



Both versions offer a different cut of Philipp's assassination. When Philipp kisses the young man, there in the Final Cut is a flashback to the wedding ceremony. Alexander remembers who that guy is - it's the young boy who was sexually abused by Philipp.
23.5 sec.



Alternative Footage:
Because of the last scene, the assassination proceeds differently. The Theatrical Version at this point is longer, since it hast to show some of the scenes that were already shown in the Final Cut.
9.5 sec.

Olympias is shown slightly longer, and so are the men that ran down the murderer. 5 sec.



Just before Alexander is crowned you see followers who are either dazed or jubilant. A part of this scene is shown later in the Theatrical Version.
5.5 sec.

One of the blood-smeared persons from just a moment ago. 1.5 sec.



Alexander is crowned longer. 3.5 sec.



At the end of the scene you again see Alexander. 3.5 sec.





Riots by the River

Alternative Footage:
During Alexander's speech there in the Final Cut is a different cut near the beginning of the scene. Alexander's comment about men who break his heart with their fear was brought forward a little. In the Theatrical version this follows after the next cut. The Theatrical Version is longer.
1.5 sec.

Theatrical Version:
Alexander personally addresses his men to convince them to cross the river with him.
34.5 sec.

Theatrical Version: Another shot of the squad. 3.5 sec.

Alexander among the crowd. 1 sec.



Theatrical Version: You can see marching soldiers. 8 sec.

At the end of the scene where the army moves on to the next battle you see some different takes. While the Theatrical Version continues the last take a little longer, the Direcotr's Cut offers a close up shot of Alexander and Soldaten in front of the sunset (facing the opposite direction compared to the Theatrical Version).
9 sec.



Just before the battle in the jungle you see Alexander in the camp, reading a letter by Aristotle. The letter is about how Aristotle found out how far Alexander already made it. The teacher congratulates Alexander and encourages him to go on even if there are many persons in Alexander's entourage who won't follow his dream.
57 sec.




Battle in the Jungle

Alternative Footage:
The transition is different due to a different scene that is shown before the battle. The Theatrical Version offers a "hard" cut to the jungle. However, in the Final Cut you first see a black screen and then kind of "zooms" to the jungle.
-



Alternative Footage:
Both versions show a different version of the scene where the elephants run towards the Macedonians and Alexander flanks along with his fellow horsemen. In the Theatrical Version Alexander follows after the elephants. In the Final Cut the movie constantly cuts back and forth from the elephants to Alexander. The whole thing is minimally longer in the Final Cut.
2 sec.

An Indian pulls one of the Macedonians off his horse. One of the Macedonians is hit by a rod (?) and another one gets a huge hatchet rammed in his chest. At the end of the sequence you see a Macedonian squatting with fear.
14.5 sec.



A long shot of the battle. Then you see an Elephant overthrowing a tree that then falls onto the Macedonians. 7.5 sec.



The elephants run against their enemies a little longer. 1.5 sec.



The elephants run a litlte longer. 2.5 sec.



One of the macedonians is slinged away by an elephant. One of the Macedonians gets hit on the head; an Indian brutally gets his throat cut; another man is grabbed by an elephant. Finally, one of the elephants gets his trunk chopped off. At the end of this sequence, one of the Indians hits an enemies head so hard with his bat, that the head actually explodes. All that happens in
6.5 seconds.



Guts come out of an elephant's slashed stomach. Then, a sword is stabbed through a man's head. 2.5 sec.



The elephant with its guts hanging out stamps on one of the Macedonians who lies on the floor. 0.5 sec.



When Alexander tries to calm his horse down before he attacks the elephant, in the Final Cut follows a flashback to young Alexander.
2.5 sec.



Alternative Footage:
Again, there's a flashback in the Final Cut. This time, the Theatrical Version shows Alexander as an adult a little longer.
1 sec.



While Alexander lies on the floor heavily injured, his horse is attacked a little longer. 2 sec.



After the elephant got his trunk chopped off, several soldiers pass a dead elephant and charge their enemies. 4.5 sec.



Alexander is carried off a little longer. 1.5 sec.



The transition to the next scene is different: in the Theatrical Version the movie cuts to the camp after the battle, while in the Final Cut you see flashback to the time shortly after Philipp's death.
-


Olympias' Confrontation

Just after Alexander's injury, the movie cuts to Philipp's death to then show the scene with his mother. In the Final Cut, you again see a few seconds of Philipp being murdered.
8.5 sec.



Olympias is making fun of Philipp's death by saying that he was killed by a little boy. 9.5 sec.



Alexander can be seen a little longer. 1 sec.

Theatrical Version: Olympias is shown later in the Theatrical Version. 1 sec.

Theatrical Version:
Because of the alternative transition, Alexander at the end of the Theatrical Version is shown leaving a little longer.
2.5 sec.


Back in Babylon

Alternative Footage:
Alexander is shown coming out of his tent a little longer - he's heavily injured. Additionally, you at the beginning see some alternative shots of jubilanting soldiers. Overall, the Theatrical Version is longer.
2 sec.

Alexander and the other men stant in front of the newly constructed statue of Zeus. Alexander lays emphasis on the importance of their success.
37 sec.



The way through the desert that cost many men their live is partially shown with different takes in both versions.
8.5 sec.



Alternative Footage:
The entry into Babylon was re-arranged a little.
17 sec.



Before Alexander can visit the ill Hephaistion, he has to take care of some state businesses. There's not enough money, therefore several ships can't be built and some provinces appear to be recalcitrant. Alexander seems to be cool with it and acts like it doesn't even bother him - he says that he just wants to visit the ill Hephaistion real quick.
38 sec.



One of Alexander's men sends one of the slaves out of the room. 3 sec.



Alexander bends over Hephaistion a little longer. 4 sec.

Ditto. 2.5 sec.

Alternative Footage:
When Alexander is standing at the window, the scene was re-cut. In the Final Cut you only see Alexander, while in the Theatrical Version you can also see Hephaistion. The Theatrical Version is longer
10 sec.

Theatrical Version: Just before Hephaistion dies, Alexander is shown again. 5 sec.

One of the guests is shown a little longer. 2 sec.



Alexander (at this point already drunk) is shown longer as well. 1 sec.

The transition to the deathbed is different, since there are some new sequences and additions in the Final Cut: you see the seriously ill Alexander before there's a flashback to his childhood. Then you see Olympias coming to Alexander's bed (which is the beginning of a scene that was already shown in the first third of the movie). Together, they share some moments of absolute luck and safety. Then, the movie cuts back to the deathbed. At the beginning of this next scene, you see Alexander's followers who pledge their troth to him. They say that they love him or try to heal him with wondrous herbs.
105 sec.



Alternative Footage:
The last moments with Alexander were put together differently. Additionally, they pretty early insertet a longer sequence in the Final Cut where Bagaos washes Alexander. In the process he tries to get up because he thinks that he has to take care of his army to continue his expeditions.
133 sec.



Alternative Footage:
Alexander's death was re-ordered as well. In the last three minutes, the Theatrical Version is marginally longer.
1 sec.

Olympias is shown a little longer before the eagle appears at the window. 1 sec.

Alternative Footage:
Both versions show alternate takes of the moment when Olympias realizes that Alexander is dead. Only in the Final Cut you see a close up shot of the eagle fighting with the snake - and losing it. In the Theatrical Version you don't really witness this. Instead, the Theatrical Version offers a longer scene of Olympias walking towards the window. The Theatrical Version is longer.
9.5 sec.



Alexander's supporters charge at each other because the one group wants to bury him in Persia while the others want to bury him in Macedonia.
7 sec.



The Macedonians scramble to get Alexander's corpse (and also to succeed him). Only the Persians (especially Prince Merdicus) have their heads straight. From off-camera you hear Ptolemaios who considers to poison some of his generals.
20 sec.




Alexandria

The Transition to old Ptolemaios is different and lasts considerably longer in the Final Cut. Ptolemaios from off-camera says that Kassander was able to cover up the possibility of having poisoned Alexander because of the faked diaries. This makes him even more suspicious to be responsible for Alexander's death.
34 sec.

Ptolemaios talks longer about himself, his grown-up sons, and compares their quest for power with Alexander's quest for power. When he goes on talking about Alexander's capabilities - if he just had maintained a low profile. He could have lived in comfort (which many of his generals were looking forward to when being in old age), but apparantly that has never been one of Alexander's goals.
171 sec.



Theatrical Version:
Ptolemaios stands in front of Alexander's statue a little longer.
3.5 sec.

The Final Cut ends the movie with the following text:






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