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King Kong

Comparison:

  • Theatrical Version
  • TV Extended Cut
Release: Apr 11, 2011 - Author: VideoRaider - Translator: Tony Montana - external link: IMDB













I. Introduction

In the early 70s, the legedary Italian producer Dino De Laurentiis unleashed the presumably most famous monster in history of motion pictures: King Kong, the eighth wonder of the world. Merian C. Cooper's original from 1933 is considered a classic, a milestone among the fantastic movie, which didn't just entertain the audience for decades but also inspired many many filmmakers. The best known fan is assumingly the New Zealand director Peter Jackson, who doesn't only have one of the largest "King Kong" collection worldwide (e.g. an original stop motion model). He also made his own version in 2005. In opposite to Dino De Laurentiis, Jackson had the opportunity to use CGI, so that there were no boundaries and he could do whatever he wanted to. Laurentiis instead didn't have another choice but doing it without the stop motion technique to revive Kong. Why shooting a remake full of effects if the bottom line is that the same tricks are being used for the remake?



So young Rick Baker put on a Gorilla costume while quite complicated animatronics were being used for close-ups. The result wasn't really satisfying - it seems like it just was the best way to illustrate Kong at that time. Despite that problem, Laurentiis was anxious to emphasize the technical development - which was the main reason for a remake - by mentioning on any press conference that Kong was the most modern roboter in history of motion pictures. Apart from the fact that the other people involved got angry about it (which is why about Rick Barker and designer Carlo Rambaldi is being spoken in high terms before the credits start), the media seemed to like it. The remake was being hyped to the biggest movie event of the year: the Time Magazone for instance reported ("Here comes Kong!", 25.10.1976). The fall was under the sign of the ape, but only until the audience saw him...



As already mentioned, the enthusiams was being kept in check. As a result of that, even today the movie often gets rejected by the audience. Actually it's not fair, but the remake from 1976 is being linked to the word flop. It's absolutely right that the movie couldn't fulfill the expectations but flop is very exaggerating. On the contrary: with production costs of 25 million USD (inflation-adjusted 2010: 89 million USD), the movie made 53 million USD (inlation-adjusted 2010: 197 million USD) only at the US box office. Decades of many successful TV, video, (HD) DVD and Blu-ray releases worldwide followed. Ironically, the remake from 1976 still belongs to the standard of the particular national licensor. Despite the bad critics, the movie got an Oscar for visual effects and was nominated for two furter Oscars. Even though Kong was colored and just played by a young Rick Baker in a costume, the movie found its audience...



"King Kong" was the climax in the career of director John Guillermin, but actually he just wanted to push it with this movie. 10 years later he agreed to make a sequel, where old Kong was supposed to live again thanks to an artifical mega heart and fall in love with a female version of his. What happened to that movie is well-known I assume.

II. Versions

Technically, there are three versions of the "King Kong" remake: the regular Theatrical Version (worldwide shown in theaters and on TV and also released on video, DVD and Blu-ray) plus two further versions, each produced for a particular medium. An Extended Version was exclusively produced for US-TV (that's the one the following comparison is about) and a Super-8 version exclusively released on Super-8. The following chapter gives some details about the different versions.

II. a) Theatrical Version (1976)
Running time: 128 min
Rating: PG

The Theatrical Version was released in October 1976 in the US. This version is certainly the most distributed one and has been released very often (VHS, DVD, Blu-ray).


II. b) TV Extended Version (1978)
Running time: 182 min
Rating: PG-13

Two years after the theater release, NBC created a 3 hrs. TV Version, split up in two parts and aired on two evenings. The Extended Version contains alomst 60 more min of footage and was only aired once. There's no info that this version has ever been released on any home media.


II. c) Super-8 Version (1980)
Running time: unknown
Rating: unknown

1980 - in times when the VCR didn't have its breakthrough yet - the home theater with Super-8 was quite expensive, but often the only opportunity to watch a classic apart from the movie theater (which means apart from one of the rare rerun). That's why several Hollywood movies were released on Super-8. The catch is: a Super-8 film spool only contains 110, 120 m footage max. which is equal to 15 min. So the movies usually needed a re-editing. These Super-8 versions are quite unique because they really are official versions. Marketing Film released the Theatrical Version of "King Kong" in 1980, split up in four parts, but there was one exception: the story starts with the arrival on Skull Island immediately.

Please find screenshots of several Super-8 movies in the footer of this comparison.



III. Comparison

The TV Extended Version of "King Kong" was aired in October 1978 on NBC. This was not just a Special Edition of the movie that included several additional minutes of footage (something movie fans nowadays know from DVD releases) - it was a heavy extended version of the movie that was split into 2 parts that were aired on 2 seperate days. You could argue that it was a kind of Event-movie. To create a two-parter, 60 minutes of footage were added to the regular Theatrical Version - this Extended Cut had a runtime of 182 minutes. The following paragraph will give you a little summary of this tremendous Extended Version.

III. a) Overview
When you look at a version that is as extended as this one is, one might think that it also includes massive additions of fundamental story lines which might even turn the plot towards another direction. However, if you take a closer look at the new footage you will find out that the structure of the movie does not change one bit. The course of action stays the same, the characters are not really deepened/further developed; not even the story offers any groundbreaking new aspects.

It's rather quite the contrary - many of the brilliantly staged moments as well as the story in general are slowed down and the suspense - especially in the (again brilliantly staged) prologue - is pretty much taken out of the movie. Partially, this happens for no particular reason. There are several occasions where they just cut in short sequences that do not really make any sense but rather just stretch out the movie. Many other scenes are unnecessarily extended - here, too, the Theatrical Version's timing was perfect, therefore it does not make sense to extend the scenes for two or three seconds. You might even get the feeling that they just tried to stretch out both parts to 80 - 90 minutes to be able to have their little Event moive broadcast.



This even leads to a few completely absurd movie scenes. E.g. there's a 9 seconds long detail shot of rocks...



...or even complete scenes (such as the dropping of the teargas containers) or shots that are included twice. Kong's climbing of the World Trade Center now lasts 73 (!) additional seconds. There's also a scene (the first moments of Kong caged on board the oil tanker) which in the Theatrical Version lasted 10 seconds. In the Extended Version, it now takes 53 seconds to tell the exact same thing - there's no additional narrative value whatsoever.

However, there are also far longer scenes that were added to the movie - some of these even destroy the movie's inner logic. In the Extended Version, we are introduced to Prescott (played by Jeff Bridges) a little earlier in the movie - inside a bar near the harbor. There, he looks at one of Petrox Oil's employees (who is a little drunk) dancing with a native. After a signal for the barkeeper, he pours some knockout drops in the Petrox employee's drink. The result: Prescott steals his clothes and uses them to sneak on board of the ship. However, we later see the scenes from the Theatrical Version. Here, Pescott - more or less openly - bribes a guard with a wad of cash. Then he sneaks on board to then hide in a lifeboat. Of course, in the Theatrical Version that makes perfectly sense, while in the Extended Version (and its additional bar sequence) this is just illogical. If Prescott has to bribe a guard to even be able to enter the area, then has to climb onto the ship on a rope where he then has to hide inside a lifeboat (even during the storm) - then why does he have to pour knockout drops in the Petrox employee's glass? He doesn't seem to yield an advantage from it. It might have worked in the script, but when you look at the movie it gets perfectly clear why they had to take this sequence out of the final movie - it just did not fit into the context of the story.



The Extended Version's highlights can often only be found in small sequences. For example, the battle of Kong vs. the giant snake is longer and less bloody - this really supports the adventure story (even though it's also possible that they had to trim down the violence to receive a better rating). When King Kong in New York steps on Wilson, you only see what's left of him - his hat inside a huge footmark. The rest of his body probably sticks on Kong's foot.



Again, it's very much possible that this comedic way of showing Wilson's death was included due to the rating, after all, the TV-Cut surprisingly also includes some instances of censorship. Very often, there's just auditory censorship - all the curses were either cut out or filtered. Censorship of violence - in the proper meaning of the word - can be found rather towards the end of the movie. Kong's death struggle on the World Trade Center's roof was massively cut for the TV Version.

Therefore, the Extended Version can only be recommended for hardcore fans of the movie. The Theatrical Version just simply works - and gained a lot fans over the years. Many fans (not all of them...) choose the 1976-remake over Peter Jackson's version of the movie made in 2005. Clearly, John Guillermins version has its own charm. The story was congenially converted to the context of the 1970's. Instead of a filmmaker looking for sensation, the movie now is about a ruthless oil tycoon who wants to find the island because of its oil deposit (and not because of its legends). Even Kong's capture makes a little more sense. The big finale does not take place on top of the Empire State Building but on top of the World Trade Center. The biplanes are replaced by combat helicopters and Kong's death is not any less emotional than it was in the 1933 or 2005 versions. Jeff Bridges' character Prescott replaces Driscoll from the original - again, he fits in perfectly in the modern scenario. The only letdown is Dwan (who replaces Darrow) - he just seems to be a little too naive. Granted, she is meant to be the small, innocent, and naive blonde. Yet still, some of the scenes are just too much of a good thing. The score as well as the camera work give the movie its own charme that make it possible to contrast with the original. The first scouting expedition of the island was staged grandiosely. The scene was shot on Hawaii - a great location that was shot perfectly by cameraman Richard H. Kline (without using any additional effects...).




The movie (that originally ran smoothly) is burdened and slowed down by the additional scenes, the everlasting repetitions, and the fact that they inexpressively went on about every single dramatic moment of the movie. There are too many side plots attached with too much importance. And the fact that they downright blew up the whole movie to two parts with a runtime of 90 minutes - regardless of the consequences - finish this version off.

Unfortunately, the Extended Version was neither re-aired nor released on VHS/DVD/etc.. Therefore, it only exists on some old VHS-recordings. Still, fans can hope for a day when the movie will one day be released with an extensive Deleted Scenes section (hopefully with all the scenes in a restored form). Maybe for its 35th anniversary in the year 2011...

III. b) Important scenes
As mentioned, the extended version contains 62 minutes worth of additional footage. Since the report is pretty extensive, I would like to point to some important scenes that might otherwise get lost in all the other additional footage. Some of these scenes would improve the final theatrical version, others again are interesting (but not necessarily important) additional information in the context of the story or might even show the films weaknesses. So to speak, these are the most important scenes that didn't make it into the final film.

Subaya-Bar
Length: 77 seconds

Mentioned before, listed again for the sake of completeness. In the extended version, the character Prescott (Jeff Bridges) is introduced earlier – in a harbor-bar. There, he observes a co-worker of Petrox Oil, dancing thightly embracedly and slightly drunk with a female local. After a signal to the bartender, he mixes a narcotic into the Pertox-co-worker's drink. The result: Prescott steals his clothers and, dressed as a Pertox-worker, he sneaks onboard – strictly speaking. Later, the scenes of the theatrical version are shown – where we see that Prescott bribes a guard – more or less – openly with a wad of cash, then sneaks on board and hides in a rescue-boat.



Unfortunately, this scene doesn't work any more in the context of the plot, because Prescott later bribes a guard to get to the ship-compound and then even has to hide in a heavy storm in a rescue-boat. Getting track of a sailor, then bribe a bartender to mix a narcotic into that sailor's drunk – just to get his Petrox-shirt and -cap seems completely absurd.

Voyeur on board
Length: 57 seconds

The montage on board of the ship was extended by further shots. Among others, you see a sailor having himself held over the railing upside down to watch Dwan taking a shower. Aside from the fact this scene is total nonsense, there had to be an extremely strange section of the screen picked for US-TV, assumingly to prevent Dwan's exposed buttocks from motivating American teenagers to start a sexual revolution. This scene is getting even more absurd, though: after a while, Prescott notices the two sailors. He throws a life belt off board and then tickles the sailor standing on deck, whereas the voyeur drops into the water. Prescott smiles after him and salutes.



Another completely unnecessary and absurd scene, which was probably supposed to get some comedy into the otherwise rather serious fantasy-story. The idea seems fairly undeveloped and misplaced. The audience does not expect nonsense-humor like this. There are some of those moments still contained in the theatrical version, unfortunately – for example when Kong tries to take off Dwan's bra – had this scene be contained, it would have killed off any seriousness during the buildup. Short, funny moments to release tension are absolutely okay. This pointless kind of humour is seriously overdoing it, though. Also, the question if the character Prescott would really risk a sailor's life like this. Or, if a normal-thinking perso would even start a move like this at full speed...

Wilson - always ready to give himself an edge...
Length: 20 seconds
Shortly before the great Kong-premiere, Prescott gets himself access to Dwan's dressing room. There, she is already being prepared for her performance. Prescott demands to talk to her – Wilson allows this reluctantly. Prescott uses this time to talk to Dwan. He wants her to come with him – and not to take part in this grotesque charade (parading Kong). Wilson talks to her and says that she would never work as an actress again, if she went with Prescott. Dwan rejects Prescott And he leaves the room. The TV-version shows more here. After Prescott has left, Wilson puts on his happy mask again and tells Dwan that Prescott would only hinder her future success. She would have to understand – there were always people trying to drag her down on her way up.



A short but still very interesting scene. It shows very clearly that Wilson always fits into the situation and only works for his own good. Seconds before flattering her again and telling her she did the right thing, he threatens her she would never get a job in the showbusiness any more, if she would leave him that evening. These stark contradictions do well for his character as the movie's villain and make a drastic difference in the perception of his character. You would almost want to love him in his own evil way. The reason this short scene is missing is, frankly, obscure.
It was probably decided to cut it out to get the film to a reasonable length. The theatrical version itself already runs for more than two hours...

Fired!
Length: 35 seconds

Good, old Wilson is not coming up the easy way – after Kong has escaped and now tramps down all New York, his boss, Petrox CEO, finds him somewhere in the screaming crowd. He shouts at Wilson and says that this desaster would cost the company trillions. Wilson knows what this means – he is fired. But not only that: no matter where he would hide, Petrox would find him and call him to account.



Wilson almost becomes a tragic figure through this scene. He puts his entire career on the line to find oil in a risky move. He finds nothing, but instead a giant ape, which (at first) saved his neck. But as it destroys New York, he is also getting fired and supposed to cover all the damage by himself. Seconds later, he is trampled to death by Kong. Wilson may be evil – but is always depicted a little marginal. He does not act out of mischief alone. He wants to be a visionary. Somebody big. A person you will remember. This is probably the reason he may often seem ruthless – this ruthlessness is based on a visionary drive, though, pushing him forward and putting humans behind one time or another. In the entire movie, he does not deliberately risk people's lives. He accepts them (or better said: he doesn't think about them very much), but never leaves anybody willingly to die (it's also Wilson who would save Dwan and Prescott on Skull Island – and not let them rot before the gate). The audience would have probably not accepted an expulsion so humiliating. Wilson is not liked, but identifiable and partly it is possibly to get enthusiastic about him. Wilson – as a movie villain – probably deserves to die – but not to be fired and humiliated.

Love...
Length: 18 seconds

While Kong rampages in New York, Prescott and Dwan have found shelter in an abandoned basement-bar. There, Dwan confesses her love to him and wants to kiss him. Prescott does not seem to be sure, though, and only succinctly says that he was just a simple worker that could never hold a ambitious star like Dwan. She seems to be hurt by this, but Prescott does not dwell on that.



A very shorts scene, which would have deepened the relationship between Dwan and Prescott and the romance-difficulty – in few seconds, because this is exactly the problem's core between them. They are so close to each other but still worlds apart. There is not only Kong between them, but all life. So much, that even at the end of the film, they cannot get each other. While Dwan cries before dead Kong and gets los in the frenzy of flashing cameras, Prescott is standing few steps away from her. She got what she wanted – fame. It is not his world – neither can he nor does he want to enter it. Even though he loves her, he cannot go those few metres towards her and hug her. Despite her tears. Despite all the things they underwent together. This short scene would have intensified the relationship between Dwan and Prescott sensibly. It's almost irony. While 95% of the new footage is only devoted to violently prolong the movie length, this one short scene would have really made a difference in the theatrical version. Because it is so short and concise.


Of course, there is more footage, but these are basically the five scenes I would consider the most important. Not only because of their length, but also because of their meaning. They show strengths (the dynamic relationship between Dwan and Prescott / the character of Wilson), but also weaknesses of the remake (let's call it the at times overexcited nonsense-humor of the 70s). Should there ever be a special edition, those would be the scenes that should be featured – as deleted scenes. Other scenes are, of course, also interesting – e.g. we see Kong picking up a car in New York and smashing it into a residence...



IV. Report

The theatrical version, released on DVD in 2002 by Kinowelt, has been compared to the TV-extended cut, broadcasted in October 1978 by NBC.

Theatrical Version

Length: 122 minutes
Rated: FSK 12

TV-Extended Cut

Length: 182 minutes
Rated: PG-13


The extended cut contains numerous additional scenes and shots. The music has also been drastically changed. Partly, scenes received a new score or the music had been rearranged to fit the respective prolonged scenes. This is not dwelled on in this report, though.
0:00:00.
The old Paramount-logo was replaced with a new, CGI-animated one for the DVD.


no time difference

0:00:45
Some more scenes of the loading of the expedition-ship were implemented.



14 sec.

0:00:45
The dropping of one of the excavator is a little longer.


3.5 sec.

0:01:16
The ship-worker Boan is only shown short in a close-up that is slightly longer.


1 sec.

0:01:17
The introduction of Jack Prescott's character (played by Jeff Bridges) starts a little earlier. He is sitting at a bar, drinking and watching the bartender mixing soporifics into the drink of an employee of the Petrox oil company (which is responsible for the expedition). This, of course, happens on behalf of Prescott, so he can sneak unhinderedly on board with the employee's identity.



77 sec.

0:01:17
A taxi drive starts a little earlier.


1.5 sec.

0:01:54
An exterior view of the ship's bridge was added.


6 sec.

0:01:54
A shot of the fax machine was added.


4 sec.

0:02:13
A long shot of the ship was added as well as another shot of Prescott sneaking aboard.


14.5 sec.

0:02:22
A shot of the ship was added.


3 sec.


0:02:29
A shot of the ship was added.


1.5 sec.

0:02:29
Alternative shot: The first officer gives the order to cast off. The only difference to the shot of the theatrical version: the extended shot is six seconds longer in total (without any narrative pluses) and the officer only lifts one arm as a sign of order instead of both of them.


6 sec.

0:02:56
Since the extended version could only be shown in fullscreen format for the TV-release, which was the one preferred by the audience back then, an artifical cut had to be made to capture all the image information of the theatrical version.



no time difference

0:02:59
Again, there is an artificial cut to present all the image information.



no time difference

0:03:02
Much longer shots of the ship were implemented.



31 sec.

0:03:14
Due to the new screen format, the writings of the opening credits had to be rearranged. Content, style and order are almost identical.





no time difference

0:06:24
Changed order of cuts: two short scenes of a radio operator and the storm were intercut into the talk between the captain and Wilson.


no time difference

0:07:08
Again, there was an artificial cut made which was additionally enriched with an artifical tracking shot.



no time difference

0:07:11
While the crew on deck is playing cards, an announcement to the crew is made, telling that everyone who is not on duty at the time is ordered to get into the projector-room. Reluctantly, the crew members quit their game of cards. Additionally intercut was another aerial view of the ship.




53 sec.

0:07:33
During Wilson's speech to the crew, there was a shot of two member intercut.


3 sec.

0:08:11
Another artificial cut to present all the image information.



no time difference

0:09:12
A shot of Prescott during the crew-meeting was implemented.


2 sec.

0:09:18
Another shot of the crew was added.


1.5 sec.

0:10:34
When Prescott reveals himself and contradicts the thesis that the carbon-dioxide-overflow on the island was not due to oil but overproportionally large animals, a shot was intercut showing the doubtful crew.


3 sec.

0:10:53
Prescott continues his speech, another shot of the doubtful crew was added here.


3 sec.

0:11:42
When Prescott's duffel bag is looked through, the first officer takes a longer look at Prescott's books.


5 sec.

0:12:05
Another artificial cut to present all the image information.



no time difference

0:13:06
When Dwan's rescue boat is sighted, you see the captain giving the order to slow down, which is done in the machine room.


17 sec.

0:13:16
Several shots of the ship's crew were intercut.


16 sec.

0:13:28
When the rescue boat approaches the ship even more, the captain gives the order to stop the machines – to this, a short scene inside the machine room was intercut.


2 sec.

0:13:43
When Dwan is gotten out of the rescue boat by the first officer, there was an alternative shot used that is roughly 5.5 seconds longer.


5.5 sec.

0:14:07
A short shot of the captain and Wilson was added.


3 sec.

0:14:11
Dwan getting carried on board is shown slightly longer.


8 sec.

0:15:13
After Dwan has arrived safely on board, a short montage is shown. Ship shots during dusk – after that, we see Prescott in his prison cell calling for something to eat. When his request remains unanswered, he angrily lays down onto his bed.



42 sec.

0:15:13
A short shot of Wilson and Bagley was added as Wilson has Prescott's finger prints checked via Fax. Furthermore, the shot of the printing fax machine was stretched a little.


12 sec.

0:16:10
Before Prescott examines Dwan, a short shot of her face was added. Furthermore, you shortly see Prescott sitting down next to her – in the theatrical version, he already is sitting.


4 sec.

0:16:29
Another artificial cut to present all the image information.



no time difference

0:21:08

The montage on board of the ship was extended by further shots. Among others, you see a sailor having himself held over the railing upside down to watch Dwan taking a shower.

Aside from the fact this scene is total nonsense, there had to be an extremely strange section of the screen picked for US-TV, assumingly to prevent Dwan's exposed buttocks from motivating American teenagers to start a sexual revolution.

This scene is getting even more absurd, though: after a while, Prescott notices the two sailors. He throws a life belt off board and then tickles the sailor standing on deck, whereas the voyeur drops into the water. Prescott smiles after him and salutes.

I'm not sure, but... I think Prescott just committed a murder...





57 sec.

0:25:44
After the motor boat has disappeared in the thick fog bank, there was a longer shot added that shows the captain doubtfully looking at them on board.


14 sec.

0:26:01
During the crossing through the fog bank, there were several shots of the crew members on board of the motor boat added. Then, there is a cut to the captain – who is still standing on the bridge, staring towards fog bank.




49 sec.

0:26:18
Again, the faces of our protagonists are pressed against the camera's lense, covered in fog.


10 sec.

0:27:00
The ride to Skull Island was extended.


16 sec.

0:27:06
An additional detail-shot of Skull Island was added.


9 sec.

0:28:42
When Wilson orders the first officer to bring the mosquito-spray, he shortly looks sceptically and then grabs back into the boat. Then, there is an additional shot of Dwan as well as anotehr view of the cliffs.



17 sec.

0:28:42
Before the team enters the heartland, you see another additional scenes at the beach.


9.5 sec.

0:29:50
Additional footage: Dwan earlier at the waterfall plus Prescott following her from the beach.


5.5 sec

0:30:49
The research of Skull Island contains an entirely new scene.



20 sec

0:30:49
Again some more research.


23 sec

0:33:06
Earlier beginning of the scene in the natives' villiage.


4 sec

0:33:20
Extended sacrifical ritual for Kong.



37 sec

0:33:42
Extended shot of the expeditionary troup watching the sacrifical ritual, Prescott takes more pictures.


15 sec

0:34:02
Further footage of the celebration.


3.5 sec

0:34:48
Alernate shot of Wilson.


3.5 sec

0:34:52
Modification to present the entire picture information onscreen.



no difference

0:34:58
Again more footage of the celebration. The end shows shots of Dwan an Prescott being enthusiastisch.




35 sec

0:35:54
Modification to present the entire picture information onscreen.



no difference

0:36:04
More footage of the sacrifical ritual including a close-up of the victim and the dancers. Additional shots of the expeditionary troup being prepared to fire at the end.




33 sec

0:36:24
Shot of the armed natives after the head of the dancers recognized the troup.


3.5 sec

0:36:38
Further scenes of the natives running square to the expeditionary troup.


19 se

0:36:52
Additional scene with Prescott's request to shoot up. In the Theatrical Version, it's just a voice-over during another distance shot.


5.5 sec

0:37:26
Extended demand of the dancer to release Dwan. He repeats it but the troup doesn't understand.


5.5 sec

0:37:28
Shot of the natives.


5.5 sec

0:38:38
Extended scene when the expeditionary troup shoots up several times to protect Dwan and scare the natives.




16 sec

0:39:42
New footage of the natives paddling to the boat.


9 sec

0:39:42
Paddling natives - this time they are moving pretty fast to to pass the fog bank. The shot is also in the Theatrical Version, but it's 3.5 sec longer here.


3.5 sec

0:40:07
Modification to present the entire picture information onscreen.



no difference

0:41:16
Shot from the cafeteria when the crew watches TV while they are eating.


12 sec

0:41:23
Prescott responds longer when Dwans asks him if he really wanted to steal a boat: "Yeap, look at my face."


5.5 sec

0:41:55
Extended shot of Dwan and Prescott looking at each other before she asks him to not return to the island.


7.5 sec

0:42:13
Extended shot of Dwan and Prescott looking fondly at each other.


7.5 sec

0:42:45
The paddling natives.


6.5 sec

0:42:57
Two more shots of Dwan getting kidnapped.


9 sec

0:43:17
Modification to present the entire picture information onscreen.



no difference

0:44:39
More footage of the ceremony.


no difference

0:44:53
Slightly extended shot of the dancing natives.


3.5 sec

0:44:53
New scene with Dwan.


15.5 sec

0:44:53
Let's dance.


3 sec

0:45:18
Dwan in trance, natives in ecstasy.


3 sec

0:46:00
While the natives unlock the gate with oil, their friends are still dancing around Dwan.




48 sec

0:46:04
Alternate shot: the natives move away from the oil-soaked log.


7.5 sec

0:46:04
Additional shot of the oil-soaked log.


7 sec

0:46:42
Still dancing.


2 sec

0:48:15
Several shots of the natives climbing up the wall after Dwan was tied up in front of the gate.


21 sec

0:48:40
The gate is closed - now King Kong can be called for his "meal" while Dwan is still out there.


18 sec

0:49:20
Repitation of the scene before.


16.5 sec

0:49:37
Close-up of Dwan.


3.5 sec

0:49:44
The editor likes Jessica Lange, that's for sure.


4 sec

0:49:44
To raise tension, shots are repeated randomly.


13.5 sec

0:50:07
Herewith I invent the official "King Kong Extended Drinking Game": everyone has to drink a shot when a close-up appears. Cheers.


5.5 sec

0:50:07
Now the end of the blurred shot of Kong which has been split up before.


no difference

0:50:07
Cheers.


6 sec

0:50:07
Repetition of the close-up of Kong's blurred face (slightly zoomed in and shortened). Before that, a shot from the Theatrical Version.


7.5 sec

0:52:07
The natives on their way to the wall.


5 sec

0:52:21
time to dance (again!).


8 sec

0:52:52
When Prescott & co. reach the village to save Dwan (way too late), they fire off a signal rocket. Footage of the fleeing natives has been added.


2 sec

0:52:52
The crew fires off like crap, the natives crap their pants.


19.5 sec

0:53:08
Prescott climbs up the wall with a rope, the remaing crew members on their way to the wall.


7.5 sec

0:53:09
Additional climbing scene.


1 sec

0:53:09
Alternate footage: Prescott and a sailor attempt to open the gate, Prescott calls for help.


4 sec

0:43:17
Modification to present the entire picture information onscreen.



no difference

1:03:49
After the Officer fired off a signal rocket for siting, that action is being protocolled on the bridge. Then a shot of the radar tracking Kong. The Officer informs Wilson at the beach.



20 sec

1:07:19
Shot of Bagley analyzing the oil sample. Suddenly he starts laughing, gets a beer from the closet, gets on the phone and gives the order to have a boat ready at the beach.



35 sec

1:07:19
Additional shot of Bagley going ashore.


4 sec

1:08:38
Modification to present the entire picture information onscreen.



no difference

1:09:10
Shot of the other side before the troup passes the canyon on the log.


2 sec

1:09:25
High-angle shot when Prescott passes the canyon on the log.


2.5 sec

1:09:27
Shot of Prescott's front.


4 sec

1:09:34
Ditto.


1.5 sec

1:09:59
Same here, but this time of the crew.


1.5 sec

1:10:02
While Kong suddenly appears at the canyon and roars, he's got plenty of tie to casually strolls there on TV.


3 sec

1:10:13
After the crew shot on Kong, they shortly remain before the first Officer fires off a further shot.


6.5 sec

1:13:06
Extended landing of the Petrox plane.


11 sec

1:13:22
The staff of the boat looks to the plane which may circle a little longer.



18 sec

1:13:43
After the plane dropped its cargo, we see the ship's crew getting ready to pick it up.


2 sec.

1:13:43
No joke - almost the complete airplane-scene is shortly repeated (with the exact same scenes) just to suggest that the plane drops some more cargo.


24 sec.

1:13:43
The crew rides towards the dropped cargo with a motorboat.


24 sec.

1:13:48
Again, some more scenes of the motorboat.


14 sec.

1:13:48
In the Theatrical Version, the plane is already gone. Here, you see it fly around some more...


9.5 sec.

1:15:21
A new scene of the digger tranching Kong's trap.


14 sec.

1:16:04
You see Boan returning from the jungle a little earlier.


11 sec.

1:16:07
When Wilson recognizes Boan, he shouts his name twice and waves his hand.


3.5 sec.

1:16:14
Wilson asks where the rest of the squad is. In the Theatrical Verson, he shouts this from off-screen, while in the TV-Cut we now see him shouting these words.


3.5 sec.

1:16:26
You see Kong wandering around on Skull Island in moonlight. He shortly hesitates and looks at Dwan, then he looks heavenwards.


36 sec.

1:17:03
There is an (actual) alternative shot of Prescott sneaks behind Kong on a crag. To expand the runtime, they inserted a long shot of Kong and added the shot from the Theatrical Version (taking place at the exact same crag) so that Prescott now sneaks along the exact same path twice (just in 2 different takes).


13 sec.

1:17:27
Just before Kong lets Dwan down, he tries to stroke her with his index finger. This scene was extended for the TV Version.


12 sec.

1:17:38
A close up shot of Kong's face was added along with the longer scene of the stroke units.


13 sec.

1:18:23
Kong can't let go of her...


19 sec.

1:18:23
Jack continues following Kong.


7 sec.

1:18:43
When the giant snake attacks Dwan, Dwans shocked facial expression is shown way longer. Then follows an additional shot of Kong's grim face.


9 sec.

1:18:51
The snake wraps around Kong's leg in a new shot, followed by an additional long shot of the battle.


12 sec.

1:19:01
Several new shots of the battle.


8 sec.

1:19:04
Kong fights with the snake.


18 sec.

1:19:18
The battle was massively extended.



21.5 sec.

1:19:23
Further new shots of the battle.



10 sec.

1:19:29
And they fight, and fight, .....


7.5 sec.

1:19:32
So that they don't lose any runtime (in the true sense wof the word), the long shot was sligthly extended.


1 sec.

1:19:34
On TV, Kong really takes his time during the battle.


9.5 sec.

1:19:36
Finally, Kong has a chance to execute a fatality move. However, the TV Version shows a longer (but less bloody) scene of it.



18.5 sec.

1:19:44
For the TV Version they used a slightly longer alternative shot of Kong throwing the dead snake away...


8 sec.

1:19:54
When Dwan and Prescott run down the rocks, the long shot was extended.


4.5 sec.

1:19:54
Kong looks for Dwan and Prescott.


16 sec.

1:20:06
The radar they use to find Kong is shown longer.


20 sec.

1:20:06
Kong angrily stamps through the forest.


7.5 sec.

1:20:49
The sailor is shown slightly longer.


1 sec.

1:21:53
When Dwan drops down on the floor with exhaustion, you now see Prescott entering the scene.


1.5 sec.

1:21:55
There's a longer alternative shot of Prescott picking up and carrying Dwan.


5.5 sec.

1:21:06
The Petrox-employees build a trap for Kong.


18.5 sec.

1:21:46
Again you see Kong stamping through the woods.


4 sec.

1:22:07
In the TV Version, Bagley and Co have to struggle some more in order to open the rampart's door.


6 sec.

1:22:07
Kong goes on stamping...


5.5 sec.

1:22:07
To stretch the movie some more, they just re-insert a scene from the Theatrical Version - the scene's content was already shown in an alternative shot.


4 sec.

1:22:11
before Logan opens the barrel of narcotics he again requests the captain to hurry up.


4 sec.

1:22:32
And again we see Prescott carrying his beloved Dwan - closely followed by Kong.


12.5 sec.

1:22:51
When Dwan and Prescott stand in front of the door, the Petrox-employees open the door's last lock. Again, the scene was extended.


7.5 sec.

1:23:47
After Kong arrives in front of the door, Wilson blandly looks at him for a short while.


9 sec.

1:23:56
Wilson's way down from the rampart takes a little longer.


5 sec.

1:24:05
While Wilson hangs on the ladder, Kong tries to break down the rampart. To expand the scene, you see a combination of alternative footage and the repetition of several shots.



19 sec.

1:24:17
Again, you see a couple of new shots and scenes. While Kong riots outside the camp, the team anxiously looks at the rampart. Meanwhile, Wilson comes down the ladder.




38 sec.

1:24:32
Again, a big block of alternative and additional footage was assembled and included.



35.5 sec.

1:24:40
For probably the thousandst time we see the shocked faces of our main characters for additional 16 seconds (!). Then we see Kong striking against the door. I just spare the excessive freeze frames...


16 sec.

1:26:18
Just before Kong rises his arm up in the air for the last time on Skull Island, they included 2 scenes of the natives arriving.


15.5 sec.

1:26:20
Several more natives look at their sleeping king...


14.5 sec.

1:26:26
They included another artificial cut so that all the picture information could be included.



No difference in time.

1:27:14
A scene that in the Theatrical Version lasts for about 10 seconds was now extended to 53 (!) seconds - that's quite an art, regarding the fact that the additional footage doesn't have ANY additional narrative value.

Trapped inside the ship, Kong looks through the small grid a little longer. In between there are shots of the crew members bringing him several crates of bananas.



53 sec.
1:29:40
In between teh conversation of Wilson, Dwan and Prescott you again see Kong roaring in the hull.


6.5 sec.

1:30:35
You again see Kong hitting the the ship's walls.


11.5 sec.

1:31:32
Kong sleeps. This seems to be so important that we see him doing that for 17 seconds.


17 sec.

1:31:32
Before Prescott and Dwan have a little talk on deck, you at first see them speechlessly looking in the sky.


16 sec.

1:32:26
In the TV Version, Dwan and Prescott kiss a little longer while Kong sits in his lock-up all alone. He smells at Dwan's scarf, which discomposes him a little.



44.5 sec.

1:32:26
Dwan and Prescott go to the bunk to have sex when they suddenly hear Kong's blowup. However, Prescott - the old womanizer - exactly knows where to set his priorities...


9.5 sec.

1:32:26
...and Kong goes on rioting.


2.5 sec.

1:32:49
Because of all that noise, no one will be able to sleep that night - not that Dwan and Prescott were planning to do so...


5 sec.

1:32:56
Thanks to Kong, Prescott does not score today. He can only run after Dwan...


11 sec.

1:32:56
Kong - as mad as ever.


14.5 sec.

1:33:28
While Kong constantly strikes at the walls, the tide gates close.



13.5 sec.

1:34:22
When Dwan wants to calm down Kong, they included a short silent moment.


15.5 sec.

1:34:38
Prescott tries to convince Dwan to let go since she can't do anything for Kong. This scene was extended.


23 sec.

1:35:34
When Dwan is inside the tank, Kong looks at her a little longer.


10.5 sec.

1:35:55
Another short moment of Dwan and Kong was inserted.


14 sec.

1:36:03
Before Dwan goes up the ladder, they again look at each other.


14.5 sec.

1:37:45
During the Kong premiere in New York you see how Prescott - who's not invided - sich zutritt Verschafft zu Dwan's fitting room.


10 sec.

1:38:24
After Prescott officially got out of Wilson's contract you see the latter's angry face. Prescott doesn't react to it.


7.5 sec.

1:38:40
Prescott aks Dwan to leave - the latter then shortly looks at Wilson.


7.5 sec.

1:38:53
When Dwan tells him that she will stay in New York, the two of them look at each other for 13 seconds.


13 sec.

1:39:12
After Prescott left, Wilson convinces Dwan that this was just the right decision and that she should leave him behind.


20 sec.

1:39:16
Underlayed with new funk music, you see several different scenes of New York's nightlife as well as Kong's big premiere.




54 sec.

1:39:42
When the helicopter lands, they inserted a short new scene where you see the spectators getting sand in their faces.


3 sec.

1:40:30
To enhance the Spannungsbogen as well as the runtime, the TV Version shows some more material just before Kong is presented to the audience.


14.5 sec.

1:40:43
Ditto.


14.5 sec.

1:40:46
Ditto.


9.5 sec.

1:40:48
One thing is for sure - they sure take some time to reveal Kong in the TV Version...


8 sec.

1:41:21
One thing is for sure - they sure take some time to reveal Kong in the TV Version... Oh, I'm already repeating myself. Well what the heck, so does the movie!


6.5 sec.

1:41:29
I just had a Déjà-vu... If I now see an agent from the Matrix I'll probably shit my pants...


5 sec.

1:42:15
When the reporters edge Kong, he gets mad. REALLY mad!



18.5 sec.

1:42:20
After Kong loudly roared for the first time, the audience anxiously startles...



10 sec.

1:42:27
When Kong smells Dwan, he breaks his chains. The spectators recoil.


11 sec.

1:42:45
Kong smashes his cage a little longer - and in a slightly different order of the scenes. Wilson's glimpse is rather stupid - and just if your're wondering whether or not we already saw that.... yes wie did!



8.5 sec.

1:42:54
We again see the shocked audience...


2.5 sec.

1:43:02
Then we again see the shocked Wilson; Kong bawls.


11 sec.

1:43:11
Kong and Dwan look each other in the eyes a little longer.


8 sec.

1:43:29
Even though Dwan already went down half the stairs, the producers of the TV Version decided to insert a sequence of her standing up on the pedestal - but who cares, this is an Extended Version of King Kong, it's not like we have to try!


2 sec.

1:43:29
One cut later we already see Kong getting down the ramp - don't worry, this scene is repeated later on after he already came down the ramp.


3 sec.

1:43:51
We see some more riots.


14 sec.

1:43:51
We FINALLY come across an interesting addition: while Wilson is pushed back and forth during the stampede, his boss - the Petrox CEO - shouts at him from the tribune that this disaster will cost his company billions of dollars. He says that Wilson is fired - no matter where he might hide, Petrox will find him to call him to account. In between we see some more scenes of the riot.




35 sec.

1:44:38
After Kong stomped Wilson to death, his foot stays on the ground a little longer.


2 sec.
1:44:40
In the Theatrical Version you only see Kong stomping Wislon to death – however, you don’t see his remains. The Extended-Cut finally reveals this secret: Wilson’s remains apparently stick on Kong’s feet. The only thing that lies on the floor is his head.


5 sec.

1:45:14
Dwan and Prescott flee through the city. In the process, Prescott tries to hot-wire a convertible to be able to drive away. When he doesn‘t succeed, Dwan makes a sarcastic comment: she says that despite all his knowledge, Prescott is useless when it matters. Prescott just smirks and the two of them continue running down the steet where they then run into the police. The policemen tell them to leave the city region as fast as possible.




40.5 sec.

1:45:14
Subsequently, Kong stomps through the streets of New York and destroys half the city. When a car crosses his path, he picks it up and thrashes it into a building at full tilt.




20 sec.

1:45:28
An additional scene of an upholding train was inserted. Then follows a shot of Kong hearing the train. He shortly hesitates and then follows the noise.


23 sec.

1:45:52
Kong wanders around in the city.


6 sec.

1:45:52
Kong again sniffs Dwan out. The TV Extended Cut shows an alternative scene of this that is slightly longer. However, all in all the whole sequence in is identical in length compared to the Theatrical Version.


No difference in time.

1:46:03
Kong waits a little longer for the train at the rail line.


2.5 sec.

1:46:15
The TV Version shows more close up shots of Kong smashing the track into pieces.


11 sec.

1:46:21
Outside: Kong smashes the train. Inside: Mayhem.


4 sec.

1:46:25
The transport services cry.


5 sec.

1:46:25
Another scene begins a little earlier – you see Kong throwing another wagon to the ground.


4.5 sec.

1:47:38
Another scene was extended: you now see Prescott and Dwan getting on the motorbike.


5 sec.

1:48:02
To expand the movie’s runtime some more, we now see an exterior wall of a house. Then follows the spongy flight of a helicopter.


10.5 sec.

1:48:19
Kong waits a little longer in semi-darkness before he converges to the Brooklyn Bridge since it is constantly circled by police helicopters. Furthermore, they used some alternative music so that the 45 seconds appear to be a little more dynamic.



45 sec.

1:49:37
Dwan and Prescott sit inside an abandoned bar. While Prescott prepares two drinks, Dwan tries to verbalize her feelings.

The whole scene was replaced with an alternative cut. Originally, it in the Theatrical Version you just saw one long take. In the TV Version you now see the scene from several different angles that all clearly originate from different takes. All in all, the Extended Version is 5 seconds longer.



5 sec.

1:50:39
While the Theatrical Version at this point already cut to the next scene, the sequence goes on a little longer in the TV Version. Dwan asks Prescott to kiss her – the latter declines since he (a simple worker) could not afford to be together with an upcoming star. Even though this was meant to come across smooth, Dwan is obviously hurt by his words.


18 sec.

1:50:46
Kong marches through the Hudson River. In between you see the US Army on the Brooklyn Bridge.


54 sec.

1:50:53
Kong gets out of the water a little longer.


4 sec.

1:50:53
Kong marches towards an electric utility – and is hit by an electric shock. After he recovers himself, he destroys the whole facility (at this point, the Theatrical Version continues).

Again, this is alternative footage. There’s a similar scene in the Theatrical Version where Kong is struck by an electric shock and then destroys the electric utility – however, this only takes 7 seconds. This scene is way more effective and action-packed.




43 sec. (-7 seconds)

1:51:49
During the power blackout Dwan and Prescott talk a little longer inside the bar.


31 sec.

1:52:13
There’s an alternative scene of the action committee that lasts a little longer and offers a little more dialogue. Just before the mayor talks to Prescott, his consultant tells him that he should only consider to go into suggestions that don’t alienate voters.


17.5 sec. (-9 seconds)

1:53:14
In the Extended-Cut Kong looks through a window while Dwan cries a little longer.


15 sec.

1:53:21
Again, he looks through the window...


4.5 sec.

1:54:07
The military advances. Meanwhile, the jet fighters prepare to get ready for takeoff – until a general says that they only want to use helicopters.



48 sec.

1:54:07
Prescott runs to the World Trade Center. On his way, he tries to steal a car – instead he decides to take a bike.


9 sec.

1:54:24
The combat helicopters take off.


14 sec.

1:54:37
Kong wanders around in the streets of New York a little longer...



22 sec.

1:54:37
...while Prescott cycles.


14.5 sec.

1:54:37
Kong again.


4 sec.

1:56:17
In the TV Version we get to see Prescott arrives at the World Trade Center.


6 sec.

1:56:22
Now follows a spongy shot of Dwan inside Kong’s hands. Then the movie cuts to a scene that was already included a few seconds ago.


5.5 sec.

1:56:22
Kong‘s climbing was extended massively, complete with alternative footage, new material, and numerous repetitions (e.g.: the soldiers are shown 4 times looking up to Kong on the WTC for a few seconds). The result: 73 seconds.





73 sec.

2:06:35
Because of the different film size, the credits had to be re-arranged.





No difference in time.
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