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Alexander

Comparison:

  • Theatrical Version
  • Director's Cut
Release: Jan 06, 2011 - Author: Doc Idaho - Translator: Victor - external link: IMDB
Oliver Stone: "I've done what I did, and I stand by it."



Oliver Stone's Alexander came up the hard way with fans, critics and historians when it hit the cinemas in 2004 and most people passed on the movie. He clarifies that a lot of the things shown in the movie do not necessarily correspond to actual events but are more of an interpretation of the sources as well as a portrait of the person Alexander. Ptolemaios, reigning as Pharaoh of Egypt for many years after Alexander's death and preserving Alexander's and his mutual story for later generations, is often shown putting this story into perspective, elaborating different perspectives and talking of the changes in the records of others.


There aren't many directors daring to approach such complex stories that events have the world for centuries to come. But no matter how one builds the movie, which elements one emphasizes or leaves out, what kind of liberties one takes to make a certain point or which of the numerous sources one chooses as a basis for ones own work – many people will criticize the decisions and thus the movie or even reject it completely. One cannot please everyone.




Oliver Stone on "Alexander Revisited"

Dear Viewer,


Why a third version of Alexander? The best answer I can manage is, I couldn’t get it out of my system. It’s a film that’s been haunting me since the theatrical version first appeared in November 2004 in the U.S., followed by a Director’s Cut on DVD in July 2005.

But neither version was complete. It wasn’t an issue of right or wrong, or good or bad, but, like an experiment, one of trial and error. I believe this version now (3 ½ hours) is my clearest interpretation of Alexander’s incredible life.

For those who didn’t appreciate the original, rest assured this is my last pass, as there is no more footage to be found. And for those of you who did like it, please share with me my passion for “Alexander”, every sublime and awkward pixel of it.

[...] And I still believe -- “Fortune favors the bold”.

Sincerely Yours,

Oliver Stone




Oliver Stone nails the issue with one single sentence of King Phillip at the end of the cave scene where he shows young Alexander the gods and heroes of Greece and their legendary actions.



King Phillip: "Who knows these things?"


And while Alexander is lead out of the dark cave into the light to epically march into Babylon there are still viewers nitpicking on Colin Farrells hair, missing key sequences and Alexanders sexual orientation.



Oliver Stone: "It's tiresome to defend a film."


From the first script in 1996 to the actual movie in 2003 many planned and written scenes have been abandoned as being too lengthy and/or expensive. Oliver Stone makes his movies for the big screen and he never wanted to depict Alexanders life as accurately as possible as a mini series for television. No matter how much time he would have been granted to make the movie in the end, he always knew that he would never be able to show it all. Selections were needed. The Final Cut now runs three and a half hours and that is much as it gets. Some things, like the siege of Tyros, he wanted to shoot but couldn't. Other things, like the oracle of Siwa, the march through the desert and the battle of Chaeronea were present in early scripts but never shot.


Oliver Stone: "I never shot the siege at Tyre although I wanted to. It was just way too expensive ..."


Oliver Stone: "Siwa, the battle at Chaeronea, and the desert marsh were scripted, then left behind and never shot ..."


Also the intrigues of the generals, especially after the conquering of Asia, have been shortened and some subplots emphasizing on their interests and influence on Alexander were never shot. Some of it is vaguely present in all versions and many never quite finished topics are recognizable in the DC and FC a bit better the in the Theatrical Version and provide grounds for speculations about Alexanders death. However, Stone admits that it is merely an error on the scripts behalf that some subplots are never brought to a clear end.


Oliver Stone: "It is a flaw in the film, no doubt, and I hold myself certainly accountable."




In August 2005 Stone released a Director's Cut in the USA and some other countries that was oddly enough even shorter than the Theatrical version, despite the fact that Stone never found much sympathy for the demands of American cinemas for a version shorter than three hours.



Oliver Stone: "I yielded to theatrical pressures to truncate the story to less than 3 hours."


Oliver Stone: "I made a best effort, but I feel now in hindsight it was a false argument to begin."


If certain sites are to be believes, there isn't much difference between the Theatrical version and the DC. Somehow, it is all the same, mainly because Stone did not put in any new scenes, save for an extension of an already existing scene and a short insertion from Aristotle. However, he did change the movies structure; for example, the battle of Gaugamela is now seen earlier. Also, the movie is a bit more fast-paced since some scenes have been trimmed down and many dialogue details have been changed, something one most likely only notices if one knows both versions. A good example is Alexander being taught by Aristotle, as shown in the report.


The Director's Cut is a bit clearer than the Theatrical Version, the structure is a bit more demanding and the opening is better designed. It is altogether better than the Theatrical Version but not obligatory if you already own it. Especially with the Final Cut being released and containing many changes of he DC as well. The Director's Cut is also the version I would recommend if you have not see the movie at all yet. I will explain later why.


The FC is the third version in two and a half years. How this came to be, Oliver Stone explains in a letter to the DVD buyers (see above). Since 1996 Alexander has kept him up at night and for Stone the whole affair was just not finished with just the Theatrical version and the Director's Cut.



Oliver Stone: "It wasn’t an issue of right or wrong, or good or bad, but, like an experiment, one of trial and error."


For the Final cut Stone took practically everything that was kept on film during the shooting. There were a few moments exclusive to the Theatrical Version but those are only missing because they overlap with events in the Final Cut.


When the 45 minutes longer final Cut was announced fans across the internet were wondering which events from Alexanders life had been added to the film, and those who did not enjoy the Theatrical Version hoped the extensions would make the movie better. But those who have seen the Final Cut were in for a surprise. None of the numerous extensions provide new settings or stages in Alexanders life. The only true big extensions concerns Alexanders servant Bagaos. The homoerotic undertones were already in the Theatrical Version too much for many viewers. In the final Cut, we now get to know the servants name, he is noticed among many beautiful women by Alexander (much to Hephaistions regret), seemingly dances only for Alexander in India and even shares a bed with him.



Oliver Stone: "Everything is important to me -- sex life, moral life, and the burdens of childhood that weighed on Alexander's mind.

Oliver Stone: "Let's not carve out the sexual as a separate arena, it's part of a whole."


Apart from Bagaos the Final Cut merely offers more detailed characterizations, deepening of the characters relations to each other and short impressions of Alexanders life – often only as a commentary from the Off by Ptolemaios. On top of that, a healthy dozen of violent scenes have been re-integrated into the battle scenes that presumably had to to be cut for the Theatrical release, for they are a good deal more brutal than we are used from the rest of the film.


The most obvious change is again the structure of the movie. The battle of Gaugamela has been moved towards the beginning again (as planned in an early version of the script) and is seen even before Alexanders childhood and adolescence. The events in Bactria have been reassembled as well. First we see the wedding with Roxane, then the movie jumps back to the discussion with the generals and the celebration before that where Alexander meets and falls in love with Roxane before the movie jumps back to the wedding night. All other changes from the DC are present in the FC as well.


The Final Cut will remain Oliver Stones last version of the film. Or so he says, just like he says that, given the chance to start over he would have presented the FC on the big screen right away.



Oliver Stone: "Why have we lost this longer form of filmmaking?


Now, is the Final cut the best version of the film? In my opinion it is, and most people who have enjoyed the Theatrical version will certainly agree. It's not "much" but the extended running time does the movie good. However, those who already thought the Theatrical Version too long will regret to hear that now there passes even more time between the two battles. Those who did not enjoy Alexanders sex life before will not be happy either. All things considered, nobody who did not like the Theatrical Version is likely to change his mind over the Final Cut.


And even if Oliver Stone disagrees, I don't think that the Final Cut should be ones first version to watch – especially when not acquainted with Alexanders life. Showing the manic warlord early on in the Final Cut and the influences and motives that have made Alexander what he was is quite interesting on an artistic level – especially when one already knows the other versions – but not really suitable for the big audience. Those who don't know the film at all should therefore watch the DC first.


Three versions of the same movie certainly raise the suspicion that there is some major cash cow milking going on. But personally I think that it is quite interesting for fans to see the three different versions. Also, the two later versions were never very expensive or beefed up with extravagant packaging in order to appear fancier than need be. The Final Cut was obtainable for about $13 and even included a free ticket for the movie 300. Sure, "Alexander" was not very successful in America so nobody can hold it against Warner that they wanted to earn back the money they had spent but they did not trick anyone into spending ridiculous amounts of money on one single movie. In the end everybody has to decide for himself whether he wants to buy an additional version of the film or not.





The censorship reports


There are two reports. One comparing the Theatrical Version to the Director's cut and one comparing the Theatrical version to the Final Cut. Since the reports were made with some time between them the structure is somewhat different. Also, further down on this site the structure and scene order of the three versions is compared since they differ significantly.


Theatrical Version: ca. 175 min. (168 min. PAL)
Director's Cut: ca. 167 min.
Final Cut: ca. 214 min.
























Theatrical Version Director's Cut Final Cut


Title


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' introduction


Childhood


Adolescence


Philipps new bride


Philipps wedding ceremony


Ptolemaios at Gaugamela


Briefing


In the camp at night


Gaugamela


Babylon


Dareios


Welcoming party


Generals


Wedding


Wedding night


Treason


Hindu Kush


India


Philipps death


fight with mother


Riot


Battle in India


Back in Babylon


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' obituary


Ending credits



Title


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' introduction


Childhood


Adolescence


Ptolemaios at Gaugamela


Briefing


In the camp at night


Gaugamela


Babylon


Dareios


Welcoming party


Generals


Wedding


Wedding night


Philipps new bride


Treason


Philipps wedding ceremony


Hindu Kush


India


Philipps death


Riot


Battle in India


Fight with mother


Back in Babylon


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' obituary


Ending credits




Title


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' introduction


Briefing


In the camp at night


Gaugamela


Childhood


Adolescence


Babylon


Dareios


Wedding


Generals


Welcoming party


Wedding night


Philipps new bride


Treason


Philipps wedding ceremony


Hindu Kush


Intermission


India


Philipps death


Riot


Battle in India


fight with mother


Back in Babylon


Security


Alexanders death


Ptolemaios' obituary


Ending credits

Director's Cut
In the preview of coming events we see Alexander's mourning devotees at his death bed.
17 seconds



Ptolemaios' introduction

Alternative scene
Alternative transition from Alexander's ring after his death to Ptolemaios telling the secretaries that according to Egyptian law he embalmed Alexander and then ruled the country as pharaoh for 40 years. He tells about the battles they fought together.
47 seconds



Alternative editing
Having little recuts in Ptolemaios' speech the Director's Cut is 2 seconds longer.
2 seconds


Theatrical version
Now, Ptolemaios is getting euphoric about Alexander's character. He tells about his ability to inspire other people to grow beyond themselves and be ready for anything. Alexander was not only great he was almost superhuman.
49.5 seconds



Alternative shot + additional information in the Theatrical version
Shortly before Ptolemaios leaves the terrace the two versions show a different perspective. In the Theatrical version, however, we hear him say that before Philipp the Persians used to bribe the Greek with gold and hire them as mercenaries.
The Theatrical version is 3 seconds longer


Olympias and the young Alexander

Alternative scene
The scene with Olympias, the young Alexander and the snake in the bed has been edited differently at the beginning. In the Director's Cut the main focus is on Alexander's mother while the Theatrical version mainly concentrates on the snake.
The Theatrical version is 9.5 seconds longer



Theatrical version
When Philipp descends on Olympias the Theatrical version shows her asking him if he really thinks that people respect him.
2,5 seconds


Director's Cut
When Alexander wants to drag Philipp away from Olympias the Director's Cut is 0.5 seconds longer.
0.5 seconds


Aristoteles

Alternative order
There has been a lot of recutting, here, and the order of the lesson has been changed.
In the Theatrical version, we begin with Aristoteles' explanation about a see-way to India, the end of the world over the Nile and back to Greece, then Alexander's question about these areas before another student pipes up and wants to know more about the Persians which is actually not supposed to be the topic of today's lesson but which gets explained by the teacher, anyway.
In the Director's Cut we begin with the other student's question about the Persians before Aristoteles explains the sea passage and before Alexander asks his question about these areas.
While a majority of the scenes is identical there are little differences, mostly because of continuity issues.
The order in the Director's Cut is definitely the better one because here Alexander's resolute behaviour marks the highlight of the scene and not the other, unimportant student which only in the Theatrical version gets commented by Alexanders with a smile. But also because his behaviour is noticeably more resolute than in the Theatrical version. In the Director's Cut Alexander underlines that conquering the east was his father's wish. And after the teacher said that the east has already destroyed so many people's dreams Alexander mentions only in the Director's Cut that it is definitely desirable to conquer the east, just as it is passed on in the myths. Now, the teacher finally gives up trying to calm Alexander down by saying that he cannot teach him to be careful about his dreams and wishes but can only warn of them.
Alexander's lust for power gets noticeable earlier in the Director's Cut than in the Theatrical version.
Summed up the Director's Cut is 30.5 seconds longer



Alexander and Philipp in the caves

Alternative order
In the Director's Cut Philipp starts telling about Zeus whose mother gave her husband Kronos a stone to eat instead of her son - Kronos ate all of his children because he was afraid they might disempower him. He also tells about the war between the titans and Olympus that broke out, afterwards. Then Prometheus, Achilles who is especially liked by Alexander followed by Oedipus, Medea and finally Hercules. In the Theatrical version Philipp begins with Achilles and completely drops Zeus. Then comes Prometheus and the rest in the order of the Director's Cut.
Summed up the Director's Cut is 24 seconds longer



Ptolemaios' explanations before the war against the Persians

Alternative order
Through a new order and some heavy cutting this scene appears a bit less excessive in the Director's Cut. While we hear about Philipp being murdered in both versions and Dareio's possible participation in this conspiracy by apparently having paid the murderer, the Director's Cut lacks several pieces of information about the turning away of several city states.
Those have not been willing to support the young king Alexander. It is mentioned in the Theatrical version that, here too, an influence by the Persians is suspected. Then Ptolemaios tells about Alexander's revenge after this betrayal and how he slaughtered thousands of people in Theben. Alexander could love like no-one else but he punishes betrayers without mercy. The rebellious Greeks were astounded and by that already defeated. Some areas have been treated mildly, especially those he liberated from the Persians at the age of 21. Also his announcement as Pharaoh in Egypt after he liberated almost the complete front Asia is reported by Ptolemaios.
Altogether the Theatrical version is 83.5 seconds longer.




The wedding of Philipp

Alternative order
The arrival of Philipp's new wife, the conversation between Alexander and his mother such as the following celebration will later appear as a flashback in the Director's Cut. Details will be mentioned at that point.
-



Briefing

Director's Cut
Shortly before the briefing in the tent Ptolemaios tells from the off that an oracle in Egypt has declared Alexander as the true son of Zeus while we see Alexander's closest allies. Something that the Theatrical version already told in the scene with the old Ptolemaios.
6 seconds



Alternative scene
Shortly before we go to the briefing the Theatrical version shows the old Ptolemaios, once again, the Director's Cut, however, shows the young one. The Theatrical version wants to make more than clear who is the narrator in the flashbacks. Since this is not really necessary the Director's Cut resigns this.
The Director's Cut is 4 seconds longer



Alternative order
Almost the complete briefing of the strategy in the dessert battle has been recut and replaced by other shots. Of almost 4 minutes in the Theatrical version less than 1 minute can be found in the Director's Cut.
So, again, instead of listing several dozens of different shots an analysis of the different versions.

Unlike the Director's Cut, the Theatrical versions shows Alexander explaining further details of his plan to successfully attack the Persian king Dareios and introducing further leaders and their tasks after Parmenion's objection.
In the Director's Cut Parmenion gets the word and questions Alexander's decision to break through a line of infantry with the cavalry. Another leader thinks this is too risky, as well. But Alexander does not respond to these objections.
In the Theatrical version, however, Parmenion presents another objection. Here, he is strictly against Alexander's decision to reach Dareios and demands the destruction of the entire army that on their way back they cannot be attacked the whole time by soldiers. Alexander responds that he is not going to go back to Greece and sees Babylon as his new home.
Then Paramenion asks him in the Theatrical version if the land on this site of the Euphrates and the hand of Dareio's daughter are not enugh for him. Before, the two have been offered to him in exchange for peace. He tries to stop him from going so deep into Asia. But Alexander sees these “presents” only as bribes for peace and wants to take down the man who he holds responsible for his father's death. Paramenion opposes that he is not sure if Dareios is responsible for that and no-one can proof it. Some men in the tent are outraged about Paramenion's opinion.
Basically, these cutting in the dialogue puts Alexander in a better light. There are less objections from his generals. His decisions in the upcoming war still seem bold but there is not the notion that he is acting against his generals too much.
Altogether the Theatrical version is 82 seconds longer.




Theatrical version
After the briefing Alexander and Hephaistion walk through the camp, meet soldiers who seem to be excited about the battle, philosophize about the impact of fear and how it can bring victory by driving the men. Hephaistion still has some doubts and is worried that he might not survive the battle. Alexander promises him that in that case he will do anything possible to revenge his death even if that means that Macedonia loses a king. Hephaistion promises him the same thing. Then they hug and look deeply into each other's eyes before Alexander leaves.
173 seconds



The battle

Theatrical version
A little after the cattle's throat was cut the seer digging into the animal's guts is missing. His face looks appalled. But he does not say a word.
11 seconds



Theatrical version
Somewhere in the battle (shortly after someone has given out headbutts with a stone)a soldier can be seen yelling at a colleague like crazy.
3 seconds



Alternative scene
After the visit to the military hospital the two versions are a little different before we see the vulture. The Director's Cut contains a wide shot of the battle field. The Theatrical version, however, contains another shot of Alexander such as other shots of people on the battle field.
The Theatrical version is 1.5 seconds longer



Theatrical version
Right after that, the vulture picking out a dead man's eye can be seen slightly longer.
0.5 seconds


Theatrical version
After both versions showed young Alexander in the cave (with Philipp) having another look at the wall painting of Prometheus getting his eye picked out the Theatrical version shows a wide shot of the battle field (which has been shown in the Director's Cut, before).
14 seconds




Director's Cut
In return we get to see an additional scene with the young Alexander and his father Philipp in the cave.
Philipp explains to Alexander that men actually hate Gods. They only pray to them because they are afraid of worse, the Titans, who will hopefully not be resurrected. Also, men will only change to the better when the Gods have done so. Alexander is supposed to forget about all these myths. But he does not consider this, one day he wants to be featured on the paintings on the walls himself with pictures of his heroic deeds. Philipp smiles and the frame changes to a panorama shot of Babylon in the dawn.
93 seconds



Arrival in Babylon

Theatrical version
Alexander enters the palace longer. 4 seconds

Alexander is walking through the palace longer. 11.5 seconds

Alexander is longer looking down on the balcony. 4 seconds

Alexander and the harem can be seen a bit longer. 1.5 seconds

Two ladies happily discover the men. 1.5 seconds

One of Alexander's men adds "Aphrodite be with me." before he wonders how he is supposed to return to his wife having seen all the ladies in the harem. 1 second


Director's Cut
A few ladies start playing music.
6.5 seconds



Theatrical version
A woman longer. 1.5 seconds

One of the men longer. 15 seconds

A man is dancing longer. 9 seconds

Same here. 0.5 seconds

After the princess requests the security of her family and Alexander asks her if there is something else her answer that there is nothing comes independently in the Director's Cut. In the Theatrical version she stumbles upon the word “request” and the prince next to her helps her from the off. 6 seconds


Three months of Babylon

Alternative editing
Here, several shorter scenes have been cut in the Director's Cut and some have been added. The scene of Alexander reading his mother's letter that has been edited beautifully to begin with and that does not only include her voice-over which is part of every director's repertoire but also contains Olympias herself being edited into the scene so clever that one might actually think that she stands right next to Alexander in Babylon instead of being in Greece has only been slightly changed.
-


Alternative editing
The Director's Cut contains a close up of the fight in the streets of Babylon. The Theatrical version contains a shot from bird's eye view.
The Director's Cut is 2 seconds longer.



Theatrical version
A shot of the celebrations in the streets.
6 seconds


Director's Cut
Alexander can be seen longer. 2 seconds

Hephaistion, too. 1.5 seconds


Theatrical version
Therefor, Hephaistion is seen shorter hunch over Alexander. 1.5 seconds


Director's Cut
But a longer shot of the servant Bagaos who wants to fill Alexander's bath. 2.5 seconds


Theatrical version
Therefor, Olympias herself can be seen a little shorter. 2 seconds

And Alexander, too, once again shorter. 1.5 seconds

Alexander asks Hephaistion to stay with him for the night after he finished reading the letter and sends Bagaos away. 20 seconds


Alternative order
Before they go on the balcony the movie already shows the wide shot of Babylon at night. But there the Theatrical version is a little longer and contains Alexander adding "Aristoteles was wrong..." before he starts naming the barbaric characteristics of the Persians.

2 more smaller cuts in the Director's Cut that show Alexander shorter. But Hephaistion longer in one scene.
The Theatrical version is 5 seconds longer.


Theatrical version
Hephaistion keeps adulating Alexander verbally after Alexander said that he loves him. 24 seconds



Another moment with Alexander.1 second


The pursuit of Dareios.

Theatrical version
Dareios can be seen on the mountain longer. 1.5 seconds

A flashback of the first battle in which Darius drives away. 1.5 seconds

Rider in the steppe. 5 seconds

Same here. 6 seconds

The burning castle can be seen longer. 2 seconds

One of Alexander's soldiers walks through the frame with a pierced head. 4 seconds


Alternative transition
The transition from the dessert to the dance in Bactria is different. In the Theatrical version there is a shot of the moon and then a wide shot of the dancer Roxane. In the Director's Cut the moon is missing and Roxane can be recognized earlier since a closer shot has been used.
The Theatrical version is 5.5 seconds longer



In Bactria

Theatrical version
Hephaistion and Kleitos get in each other's way when Kleitos pushes Hephaistion a bit. 6 seconds

Roxane is dancing for a moment longer. 4 seconds

After the briefing with his generals Alexander and his men can be seen longer. 3.5 seconds

The generals watch the wedding discontentedly. A part of the scene of Alexander lifting his wife's hand appears later in the Director's Cut. 3.5 seconds

Ptolemaios tells from the off that Alexander really loved Roxane. We see Alexander receiving a golden egg. 33.5 seconds



Director's Cut
Therefor, shortly after, the Director's Cut shows Roxane a moment longer.
2.5 seconds


Alternative scene
The transition from the celebration outside to Alexander and Hephaistion in the inside is different. The Theatrical version shows Hephaistion longer as he is walking around outside. The Director's Cut, on the other hand, Alexander being inside.
The Theatrical version is 9 frames longer


Theatrical version
Right after that, Hephaistion can be seen longer.
0.5 seconds


Alternative scene
Hephaistion and Alexander approaching each other is edited differently, too.
The Director's Cut is 4 seconds longer


The wedding night

Theatrical version
Here, the Director's Cut has been cut at 7 occasions making a difference of 11.5 seconds.



Alternative scene
In the Director's Cut they look into each other's eyes longer and Roxane calms down before they sleep together.

20 seconds


The Theatrical version, however, contains a much longer sequence. Alexander pulls a scroll and a dagger from under the blanket. While he holds the scroll he puts the dagger aside and Roxane grabs it, immediately, and holds it against Alexander's throat. She threatens to kill him and Alexander invites her to do so. Roxane hesitates and her anger starts fading away, then she gets off him and they start kissing.
118 seconds



Director's Cut
Right after that, a little of the sex is missing in the Director's Cut.
3 seconds




Alternative scene
The next shot of them kissing a bit wildly and uncontrolled uses different angles in each version.
The Director's Cut is 10 frames longer.


Alternative scene
The finale is different, too. The Theatrical version contains only few close ups of their faces. In the Director's Cut the sex is noticeably longer and filmed from a proper distance. But there are some additional close ups, too.
Images from the Director's Cut



Alternative scene
Right after that, when a comment from Alexander's mother was edited together with scenes of Alexander and Roxanne the two versions use different editing. The Theatrical version is a little longer, too.
14.5 seconds


Flashback to the arrival of Philipp's new wife

Alternative order
Here, as a flash back the conversation between Alexander and his mother when Philipp's new wife arrives. Here are the differences.
-


Alternative scene
When the two newlyweds get off the waggon the Director's Cut shows them longer. The Theatrical version, however, shows Olympias.
No time difference


Theatrical version
The Theatrical version ends this scene with Olympias' remark that Philipp will never leave the throne for Alexander just like that. The Director's Cut contains a noticeably longer scene...
8 seconds


Director's Cut
Here, a confrontation between Alexander and his mother appears. The Director's Cut contains the remark about the throne but here Alexander asks Olympias what she wants him to do. Olympias tells about a complot but Alexander gets angry because he knows this will lead to a civil war. Olympias thinks so, too, but she also thinks that Alexander will be victorious because all the young men of Macedonia support him. She tells him that he has nothing to fear when he kills Philipp because Philipp never wanted him and would probably kill Alexander himself. Olympias re-emphasizes that Zeus is his real father. Alexander grabs his mother and makes it clear that he will not take action against his father. Shortly before he leaves the room he asks his mother if she has ever loved his father. She is outraged and says that she never stopped loving him.
125.5 seconds



In the Hindu Kusch

Director's Cut
After Alexander asked his servant who tried to poison him we see soldiers going to the tent of one of the conspirators. The man notices that and piles a sword in his body before he can be arrested.
11 seconds



Theatrical version
Therefor, the next shot of servants being questioned about the assault begins a little earlier in the Theatrical version.
3.5 seconds


Alternative scene
When Philotas gets caught and claims that he did not do it there has been a slight recutting when he turns to his friends. Here, the Theatrical version contains an off-commentary from the old Ptolemaios who says that nobody spoke for him because nobody liked him.
The Theatrical version is 2 seconds longer


Alternative order
The shot of the soldier in the dusk can be seen a little later in the Director's Cut. And a little shorter.
2 seconds


Alternative scene
Also the conversation on the mountain in which the further course of action is being discussed is edited differently at one part. The Theatrical version contains another off-commentary and a short scene with the proconsul Parmenion who stayed and is now having a good time in Babylon and who has to be taken care of if new supplies shall be secured. The Director's Cut shows this shot of Parmenion shortly before he is being murdered.
Summed up the Director's Cut is 4 seconds longer


Director's Cut
The servant extinguishes the lamp before he gets into Alexander's bed.
7 seconds


Flashback to the big celebration

Alternative order
Here, the flashback of the celebration that the Theatrical version has already shown earlier.
-


Director's Cut
As a transition Alexander is shown drinking.
10 seconds



Theatrical version
Kleitos comes to Alexander with his wife on his shoulders.
7 seconds




Alternative scene
Philipp and a friend playing with a young man in the background is edited differently and uses different shots to some extent. However, no version is more explicit in one way or another.
The Theatrical version is 2 seconds longer


Back at the Hindu Kusch

Theatrical version
At the Hindu Kusch Roxane can be seen a moment longer.
1 second


India

Theatrical version
One of the soldiers notices the first monkeys in the trees with his sword pulled. 1 second

The men fight the monkeys longer. 2.5 seconds

The monkey is in the cage longer. 1.5 seconds

Roxane looks at the monkey disconnectedly. 2.5 seconds

Alexander is kneeling longer next to the monkey. 2.5 seconds

Same here. 1 second


Director's Cut
Now, the Director's Cut contains one more shot.
1 second



Theatrical version

During the monsoon a few men are struck by lightning. 3.5 seconds



Men banish the snakes The Director's Cut contains part of that scene a moment later.. 6 seconds



Alexander is hunch over his friend longer. 1 second

The man is lying on the ground dying. 2 seconds



There is noticeably more dancing. The Director's Cut contains part of that scene a bit later. 12 seconds

After Alexander has kissed the dancer he can be seen for a moment longer. 1.5 seconds


Alternative scene
For a few seconds the huffy conversation between Kleitos and Alexander is edited differently.
The Director's Cut is 1 second longer


Theatrical version
Alexander turns away once more after he and Kleitos yelled at each other.
1.5 seconds


Director's Cut
Alexander is sitting longer on Kleitos crying right after he murdered him.
6 seconds



Theatrical version
After Alexander killed Kleitos he mourns in his tent for three days. His wife Roxane tries to talk to him but she is stopped by Hephaistion. Then, Hephaistion talks to Alexander and tries to cheer him up. But that hardly works.
97 seconds



Flashback of Philipp's death

Alternative scene
The following flashback to the arena in which Philipp will die mentions a different time. In the Director's Cut the happenings were 9 years ago. In the Theatrical version only 8 years ago.
No time difference


Theatrical version
Olympias can be seen a moment longer when she takes her seat. 1 second

The arena can be seen a moment longer before Philipp enters. 2.5 seconds


Across the river

Director's Cut
The Director's Cut finishes the flashback with an additional shot of the crowned Alexander and then jumps to the river in India that many do not want to cross.
2.5 seconds



Alternative order
The scene between Alexander and his mother right after Alexander was crowned in which he asks her about her involvement in Philipp's death appears later in the Director's Cut – after the battle in the jungle in which Alexander gets injured heavily.
-


Alternative order
At the beginning of Alexander's speech a part of it was edited differently in the Director's Cut, Alexander's remark about the men breaking his heart with their fear appears a little earlier. The Theatrical version contains this scene in the next cut.
The Theatrical version is 3 seconds longer


Theatrical version

Alexander approaches some of his men in person to convince them to cross the river.
32 seconds



Marching soldiers can be seen. 8.5 seconds



Alternative scene
When the army moves to the next battle the end of the scene contains different shots. The Theatrical versions stays in the last shot longer, the Director's Cut contains a close up of Alexander and some soldiers in the dawn.
The Director's Cut is 9 seconds longer



Director's Cut
Shortly before the battle in the jungle we see Alexander in the camp reading a letter from Aristoteles who found out how far Alexander has made it. The teacher encourages and congratulates Alexander and urges him to continue even if many in his environment do not want to follow his dream.
57 seconds



The battle in the jungle

Director's Cut
An elephant knocks over a tree which falls on the enemies. 4.5 seconds



After the elephant got his trunk cut off several soldiers throw themselves across the dead elephant towards the enemies. 4.5 seconds



Theatrical version
When Alexander is carried away on his shield the Theatrical version shows more of the forest that moves past Alexander.
3.5 seconds


Director's Cut
Right after Alexander being injured the movie jumps back back to Philipp's death to show the scene with his mother afterwards, the Director's Cut repeats a few seconds of Philipp being murdered.
9.5 seconds



After the battle

Alternative order
Right after that the scene that has already been shown in the Theatrical version. For continuity reasons the Theatrical version is a little longer at the end when Alexander leaves the room.
The Theatrical version is 3 seconds longer.


Theatrical version
The injured Alexander stepping in front of the cheering crowd is shown longer. A part of the crowd appears in the Director's Cut a few seconds later.
2 seconds


Director's Cut
Alexander and the other men are standing in front of the newly built statue of Zeus. Alexander accentuates the importance of their success.
37 seconds



Alternative scene
The way through the dessert that costs many men's lives is in parts shown in different shots.
The Director's Cut is 5 seconds longer.



Back in Babylon

Theatrical version


The return to Babylon lasts longer. 15 seconds



Same here. 2 seconds

Alexander can be seen longer above the dying Hephaistion. 4 seconds



Alternative scene
When Alexander is standing at the window there has been some recutting. In the Director's Cut we only see Alexander, in the Theatrical version we see Hephaistion, too.
The Director's Cut is 1 second longer.


Theatrical version
Shortly before Hephaistion's death Alexander can be seen longer, once again. 5 seconds

The other men are running to the death bed longer. 3.5 seconds


Alternative scene
The scene with Alexander and the lion head is edited differently in a short part in the middle.
The Director's Cut is 1 second longer.


Director's Cut
The scenes with the deadly ill Alexander in his bed are longer at the beginning in the Director's Cut.
44 seconds




Theatrical version
While Alexander's death is being told we see more shots of Babylon and his mother's apartment. 9 seconds

Olympias longer in her chambers before she goes to the window. 3 seconds

She approaches the window longer. 14 seconds

Olympias breakdown is missing after the eagle has crashed. 7.5 seconds




Director's Cut

Alexander's following is pushing each other longer after his death.
5.5 seconds




Theatrical version
Here is a little skirmish, too. 0.5 seconds

Same here. 5 seconds



Alexandria

Director's Cut
The hand of the old Ptolemaios can be seen longer at the beginning.
2.5 seconds


Theatrical version
Ptolemaios is talking longer about Alexander who could have just settled down with his wife and kids and would still have died as a glorious man. 10.5 seconds
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